Archive for February, 2013

Raw Cuts With Kuma #3: Compy Core

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Welcome back, Chipwinners!  Judging from the good bit of positive feedback I got from you guys regarding last week’s Decktonic interview, I’m guessing that you’re enjoying these!  I’d like to thank all of you in advance for the support, and hope that you keep coming back here for more raw, unfiltered goodness!

That being said, this week’s interview lightens the mood some as we talk to Dylan Brown aka CompyCore, a dynamo of a chiptune artist and graphic designer who’s taken the time to talk to us about the finer things in life, such as art, clothing, and Skittles.
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Kuma:  So lets start with something simple.  “Compy”: where’d this nickname come from? I’m a curious Kuma.

CompyCore :  Compy is actually just short for Companion.  It was an online alias that I would use for Half life 2 multiplayer.  Eventually everyone started calling me “Compy” on there, and it became a thing.

Kuma:  Ah, very cool.  So did you come into the whole chiptune thing as a gamer first, or did chiptunes make their way into your life in a completely different way altogether?

Compy:  Yep, video games have always had a HUGE impact on my life.  I was raised by a Sega Genesis as a kid, and I can’t imagine what my life would be like without games.  It probs would be pretty boring.

Kuma:  Is it also safe to assume that video games have also had an impact on your style as an artist, as well, or does that inspiration come from a different source altogether?

Compy:  Definitely.  I’ve been doing pixel art now for 12 years, and graphic design for 2.  My start as an artist began as a 10 year old making shitty free ware RPGs with a program called the OHR RPG Creation Engine.  Most of the work I did with it was solo, but I did have a few small projects I worked on with a friend of mine that went by “spoonweaver”.  It was a fun little rpg creation engine that was really user friendly, and had a great supportive community behind it, too.  Highly recommend it to anyone looking to get started into indie games.  Back then I used the alias “blue pixel”, so you’d have to look that up to find my games.

Kuma:  Very nice.  Now that we’re on the topic of your art, I’d like to take the time to ask you about it more in depth, particularly about your most recent project: ToastyCo.  After years of making art for and related to video games, and even making music using video game hardware and software, what was it in you that decided to go with clothing company?

Compy:  Haha!  It was actually a really random idea at the time that sorta snow-balled.  The “Play it LOUD!” design was a class project in college, and all my friends and I thought it would make a great tee.  I mentioned the idea to one friend of mine, and his neighbor does screen printing.  From there, it snow balled into more designs, more interest from friends, more people hearing about it, and before you know it, I’d have 20 different items, and a clothing store opening.

The design that started it all.

The design that started it all.

Kuma:  Lets talk about this store opening.  When and where is it happening?

Compy:  The store’s opening Friday, March 1st in Thurmont, Maryland, on Woodside avenue.  The shop was an old hang out spot of mine as a kid.  It was an old skate shop in town. It was the only real hang out spot in town, so I’d end up going there almost everyday and hang out with friends of mine.  The owner of the building’s a friend of mine and he’s been trying to sell it for years.  I feel like if I’m gonna have any success in this town it’ll be there, through the memories me and my friends have made there years ago.  It only makes sense that it should be the first place I open a retail store.  It’s a real small town though, so I’ve got my fingers crossed that it goes well.

Kuma:  That’s quite a gambit, considering it is a small town, but from what I’ve seen from having partied with you at 8static and MAGFest, you’ve got energy in spades, my friend. Do you think you’ll be able to bring that same kinda energy to your sleepy little town as you do to the shows you party and perform at?

Compy:  Maybe.  I do plan on using the building as a venue for tons of parties/shows, so hopefully the people will get pumped about that.  I’m also using the back of the store as sort of a “home base” for ToastyCo., giving me a place to do my own printing if I wanted to store shirts, etc.  I’m sure it’ll take some time, but things will get going.

Kuma:  I definitely have faith in you and your vision my friend, but what you just mentioned now about using it as a venue brings me to something else I wanted to ask you.  From what I remember, you mentioned wanting to throw a chiptune party in commemoration of the stores opening.  Now obviously, you’re gonna be performing there, but are there any other artists we can expect to see out there?  Can we expect to see a regular scene in Maryland now that you’re opening your store?

Compy:  It’s really hard to call that one.  The only other chip artist driving distance from me right now is datacats.  Trey Frey moved to like, 4 hours away.  Kedromelon is up in your parts these days.  I’m probably going to be the only chip artist preforming there regularly, but if anyone ever shows up, they’re more than welcome to have a stage to dance upon, and an ear to listen.

Kuma:  I’m definitely glad to hear that.  You know, regardless of how spread out the scene is, we’ve definitely seen success in small movements that grew and grew fast.  Solarbear already has the second annual Brkfest in the works and the Piko Piko guys are skyrocketing right now.  Disregarding what scenes are hot right now and your current priorities revolving around the store opening; if you could be in any one place–as far as chiptune is concerned–where would it be and why?

Compy:  Oh, that’s hard!  Haha!  I guess either Detroit or Cincinnati   I’ve got mad love for everyone in both communities there.  I’m actually making my way up to Detroit for the first time this April.

Kuma:  Very nice!  Any chance of hearing anything new at these shows?  I’d love to hear more stuff along the lines of Frost Magic or Ristones.

Compy: Yes!  Lots of new songs on their way!  I might be releasing something tonight actually, so watch my soundcloud for that!

Kuma:  I definitely can’t wait to hear it!  Heck, I just might include it in this interview when I post it!  That being said, I think this is a good place to end our interview, but before we go, do you have any last words or thoughts you’d like to share for our readers?

Compy:  Life is beautiful.  Stay positive, stay boosted.  Also, Toasty Co.:  Home of the best shirts in the world!  All shirts come with a free packet of Skittles!

Kuma:  Yo, why do all your shirts come with Skittles, anyway?

Compy: Because I can’t mail chocolate in the mail!  It’ll get all squished up!  Also, Skittles are better.

Kuma:  Thanks for boosting ChipWin with this interview, homie.  Peace.
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Hope you enjoyed this interview as much as I did!  Don’t forget to hit up Toasty Co. for the some of the coolest t-shirts on the planet, all of which come with a bag of skittles and stickers!  Also, be sure to follow CompyCore on SoundCloud to hear the latest this spunky, sugar powered chiptune artist has to offer!

Tune in next week for Raw Cuts #4 with Jay Tholen, as we discuss his music, art, faith, and a new project he’s working on that you should definitely keep on your radar!

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Relevant Links:
CompyCore on Souncloud
CompyCore on Bandcamp
ToastyCo. Clothing on Facebook
ToastyCo. Clothing on Tumblr
ToastyCo. Clothing’s online store
ToastyCo.’s Grand Opening Event

internet killed the video star

ChipWin-tern Spotlight: Leto II

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Hey there kids, welcome back to the Spotlight. Hold onto your butts, because we’ve got a short but crazy ride this week with Nathan Streeper, known to the chiptune world as Leto II!

So our buddy Nathan here, from Atlanta, Georgia, comes from a background a little different from where you might assume the normal chiptuner does – you hear chiptunes, you think the person’s big into dance music, or electronica, right? And it’s a logical assumption – much of the higher end music production software used in chiptunes is certainly used for those kinds of music. But no – whilst Nathan has been doing music for half of his life (that’s 14 years!), much of it has been in the punk scene- he actually has two bands right now which you can check out (Bodyfather and Burners). In 2011, though, he heard  the siren call of Fruityloops 9, and started going to town making “the music for the games in my head” – which is, I think, something that all of us can resonate with, since I know that’s how I feel when I’m writing my music.

So as you can see from the album art, this album spanned from 2011-2013. The tracks themselves actually took relatively little time to make – he didn’t really master any of them, he just let them sit for a while, until he started showing them to his friends, who really liked his stuff. (PROTIP: WHEN MAKING MUSIC, HAVING SUPPORTIVE FRIENDS IS A LIFESAVER.) This got him making more and more tracks, and suddenly we’ve got his first album. What I think is really neat about his first album is his punk evidence is really obvious – only one of the eight tracks is over 1:15, and most fall short of a minute. And like most punk music, you get these really tight and fast drums and lead part. Even the slow songs are at least relatively upbeat – it reminds me of somewhere between Kirby and Megaman (I think he actually uses some Megaman SFX in a few tracks), and since those are basically my two favorite videogame franchises over 20 years old, I’m okay with this.

Two weeks later, we got “My Imaginary Friend, Happy” which was a more serious attempt at an album, and it shows. He did his own mastering, so the levels sound a little more natural, and there’s some neat panning effects he does. The eponymous track shows how far Nathan came from just randomly creating stuff he thought sounded good to making a polished product.

And there we are! Remember to click the links up at the top if you want some punk music, and click the link below if want to download his fancy music!

Bandcamp

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ChipWIN Track #16: Small Wonders by datacats

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So you just affirmed how sexy you are with Br1ght Pr1mate, and you’re feeling good! Yet sexy is only skin deep and only lasts so long.  What if that sexiness fades away?  What if there’s something more to life you’re missing, something beyond the surface?  As these existential questions start to plague your mind, a tune starts playing and, like the twinkling of the stars in the night sky, its soft melody whispers into your ear and reminds you that whatever this life may bring, there will always be something beautiful, and even simple, to assuage those fears if you just look and listen.  Life may be an uncertain and frightening thing, but its also full “Small Wonders”.

datacats

He hasn’t been in the chip game for very long, but Chris “datacats” Connelly brings with him a very unique musical aesthetic to the compilation.  Able to conjure up introspective emotion in a way similar to Diamond Machine‘s nostalgia fueled assonance, he’s also capable of making rather haunting melodies that leaves one feeling a bit uneasy.  That may not sound like a desirable trait at first, but when you listen to some of his darker work, you start to understand that datacats has a very unique comprehension of what it is to manipulate a listener’s emotions and state of being with his music.  This haunting, uneasy tonality is something that’s particularly strong in his song “Return Trip”: a dark ambient track that invokes a sense of uneasiness more common to the industrial scene than to the chiptune scene.

That being said, while datacats can make haunting melodies, he’s also capable of making music that simply stirs the soul and makes one feel surprisingly content and meditative or just straight up makes you feel pumped.  Tracks such as “Cherry Blossom” show off his ability to make music akin to the subtle, touching sound he achieved in “Small Wonders”  while tracks such as “bitrot” show off his ability to make more aggressive, dynamic music one can simply boogie down to.

Regardless of which aspect of datacats you like, this is another up-and-comer that is sure to please, so if you’re really digging his sound, I strongly recommend checking out his EP “Sentinel Solaris” and following him on Soundcloud, where you can listen to the man’s progress and see for yourself that he truly has a lot to offer to the scene.

Til next time.

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Relevant Links:
datacats on Bandcamp
datacats on Soundcloud
datacats on Facebook
datacats on Twitter

datacats on

Raw Cuts With Kuma! #2: Decktonic

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Hey guys! Welcome back to another edition of Raw Cuts With Kuma.  Did you enjoy the last interview with SKGB?  I sure hope so!  That being said, this time we have an interview with a very well rounded figure in the scene (he came from a background in game design and has found a home in music production), and who’s rather well known on the east coast.  I took the time to talk to Christian Montoya, the man also known as Decktonic. We chatted about his music, the state of the current chipscene, and some recent events that have shaken it up in the past couple weeks.  Lets get to it!
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Kuma:  So what got you into music in the first place?

Decktonic:  In 2009 I was making my own Flash and iPhone games and I thought I might try to make my own soundtrack music as well, and it was right around the time that KORG DS-10 came out, and I just picked it up on a whim while at my local Gamestop.
I had no intention of making dance music, I was just thinking I would make simple loops for my games, but as I started exploring the program, I realized I could do a lot with it, and that tipped me over the edge of the rabbit hole with electronic music production.

Kuma: Very cool.  That being said, as you just mentioned, you did come into this with the intention of doing it originally just to make loops for games you were working on at the time.  Would you say that since then, your passion for music has over taken your passion for gaming?

Decktonic: I would say the two have diverged.  I still design games for a living, but music is a hobby that I like to pursue when I want to relax while still flexing my creative muscles.  My style has also diverged, since I don’t do soundtrack work at all.  I’ve been obsessed with electronic music for as long as I’ve been obsessed with video games (as long as I can remember) and I think music production has allowed me to get in touch with this obsession in a very deep way.  It’s also very important for me to look at music on its own, not as part of another creative work but for the purpose of making songs that stand on their own as just “good music” (whatever that is).

Kuma:  Hahaha.  Well so far, I can definitely say of what I’ve seen [of your performances] and heard of your music that you definitely know what good is, but you express a sentiment that I’ve heard echoed a lot among people in the chiptune and vgm scene, which is this dichotomy of wanting to make music for the sake of music but also acknowledging the video game roots that this genre of music has because of the hardware and software used to make it.  As someone who’s been on both sides of the fence creatively, was it easy for you to separate the two or is that something you think-even if it doesn’t particularly apply to you- may be a hurdle for the genre in general?  Is it not possible for the masses to be able to separate the music from the gaming culture?

Decktonic:  That’s a loaded question, so forgive me if I ramble in my response.

Kuma:  I’m aware that it is, so pardon me if you feel like I’ve put you on the spot.

Decktonic:  No this is good, lemme see… The way I see it, any producer under 30 grew up with video games.  Their influence is present in all styles of music these days.  Hmmm… there’s chiptunes, and then there’s music made with old gaming hardware.  I don’t fall into either of those categories.  I make music with a Nintendo DS program that emulates a classic KORG analog synthesizer that was all the rage in electronic music production before the NES existed.  If there’s any nostalgia that I’m to associated with, it’s the raw underground electro music of the 80s.  The early days of synth music, maybe.  That’s what a lot of my work has been compared to.

At the same time, I’m totally comfortable with the EDM community and have been known to play in modern software like Ableton Live and Traktor a few times, but I do call the chip scene my home, whether I fit in or not, and I’ve seen this issue quite a bit.  It’s something everyone is still figuring out.

There’s a lot I could say about it, but here’s the best way I can put it: if producers want to take advantage of that retro game nostalgia, that’s cool.  There’s nothing wrong with it.  I wouldn’t be afraid of that.  If producers want to keep their distance from it, then chip music needs to establish it’s own culture.  Not just an underground Internet counter-culture, but something that speaks to the nature of the music itself.  I think chip music was meant to be the new punk, but I haven’t seen enough of that.  I like getting down in the pit to some Nullsleep or Monodeer, and if that’s the culture we like, let’s put that at the forefront.  Let’s wear it on our sleeves.

Oh, one last thing I was going to add to that.  I don’t think the two are mutually exclusive.  I think it’s fine if some producers go in one direction and some in another.  There’s this false notion that the community needs to be one scene with a common mindset.  That would be a mistake.  It’s a big community.  Niche, maybe, but there’s a lot of potential.  I like that things are going in a lot of different directions.  It lends itself to more creativity and freedom of expression.  We should embrace that.

Kuma:  I like that sentiment.  It’s very thoughtful on your behalf and I like that you aren’t afraid to tackle the fact that regardless of how chip is accepted or interpreted that its roots are what they are and there’s nothing to be ashamed of, no matter which direction we choose to take it in.

Speaking of directions, I and a few other artists have noticed that-especially with the end of Blipfest (RIP)- chip seems to be migrating out west and seems to be finding a very comfortable spot in Detroit, a state well known for producing and embracing new and cool music historically, from classic Motown R&B and Soul to Punk Rock to Acid House and D&B.  As someone who’s been primarily out on the east coast, how do you feel about the focus of chip shifting towards these other states and how do you feel the shifting of the spotlight from the east coast to the midwest will affect what’s happening here in places like NY and Philly?  And yes, Detroit is a state now.

Decktonic: (LOL)  Honestly this is something I’ve thought about a lot.  First of all, it’s great that chip music is finding more “homes” in the USA.  It makes sense that collectives should be springing up in different areas, and let it be said that what’s been going on in places like Detroit or the Midwest US (see: BRKfest) is totally home grown.  These are local movements that are entirely grassroots born and raised, we are talking about a bunch of young chip heroes just getting together and throwing shows however they could. It’s impressive what they’ve been able to accomplish in a short time, I look up to these guys.

As for New York City and Philadelphia, let’s face it… the music scenes here are very commercial.  There are a few established chip monthlies (8static, I/O, Pulsewave) that are doing well but otherwise there isn’t much interest among promoters to do what I will call “weird music.”  This is considering that these two cities have a lot of electronic music, but it’s all in the club scene and if you aren’t making dubstep, trap or dutch house and DJing all the top 40 hits then you won’t be getting much attention around here.  The chip scene is still just a handful of people throwing shows when they can and usually doing it as a labor of love.

I’ve seen a lot of independent music venues and art spaces come and go in the past few years… it’s hard to make the “weird music” venue thing work when rent is so high.  Now I’m not complaining… I love this area.  We just have our work cut out for us in terms of growing the audience, taking on bigger risks and ultimately carving out a bigger scene around here. I’m very optimistic.  And who knows?  If I get a chance to take my brand of bass beats out to Detroit or Kentucky or some other corner of the globe, that would be awesome

Kuma: While I’m definitely optimistic about the future of “weird music” as well, I must admit I’m glad you bought up the idea that New York’s music scene is very safe because it brings us to a much more recent event.  I’m sure by now you’ve heard through the grape vine about what happened to Oliver Hindle aka Superpowerless.  While -like him- I’m not necessarily surprised by the fact that the judges on Britain’s Got Talent didn’t let him through into the next round, what I am disconcerted by is the idea that he and his friends were made to look like damn fools by the mainstream media.  Do you think this recent experience will be a hindrance to the scene and act as a sort of scarecrow, keeping chip and vgm artists away from the spot light of mainstream media fame, or do you think we’ll actually break through that barrier and be commercially accepted?  Furthermore, do you think -considering the fact that some of us have found relative success just by being “internet famous”, so to speak- that current main stream media success is even necessary for us to survive and thrive as scene or genre?

Decktonic:  First of all I respect Superpowerless for taking such a big risk in all this.  I’m kinda torn about the whole thing.  On one hand, if I had a chance to be on a show like that, I’d probably jump at the opportunity.  On the other, I wouldn’t expect anything different.  I see it as a combination of a negative perception of electronic music and another negative perception of “nerd culture.”  I don’t really have any advice in this matter, other than to say that we aren’t the first ones to go through something like this.  The earliest computer musicians were looked at as a novelty and a sideshow act.  For a while nobody was willing to accept synthesizers on stage.  I guess all I can say is don’t be ashamed of it.  I think it’s futile to try and get validation from people that obviously don’t get it.  Do I expect the judges on Britain’s Got Talent to appreciate chiptunes? No.  I think it’s a matter of finding the audience that does appreciate the kind of music you are doing, and focusing on them.

For a while electronic music just existed in underground clubs.  It was totally separate from mainstream pop / rock / jazz.  They had their own labels, their own shows, their own scene.  The electronic music movement even had to do their own festivals.  It was only recently that we’ve seen electronic producers and DJs sharing stages with rock and hip hop artists.  Basically what I’m trying to say is, let’s build what we have and not worry about the people who just don’t get it.  It’s an exercise in futility to do anything else.

Kuma:  Well said.  That being said, there is one last question I do have for you, and that concerns the scene itself.  No outside influences or interpretations.  None of that crap.  It involves age, and I’m not simply talking about the age of those involved in the scene.  I’ve met young cats like Chasingbleeps from Ireland who’s only 15 whipping out some great stuff for a first LP and I’ve seen guys like 4mat who have been doing the computer and chip music thing for more than 20 years now, which is astounding to me and makes me respect him and his music even more, but I digress.  When I say age, I mean the lifespan of the scene itself.

While there is definitely a lot of life popping up in a lot of places, there are also little pockets, little murmurings here and there already about people concerned about how long chip will last.  How long will the Game Boys keep ticking?  How long do they really have until it becomes something tired, and they’re talking like it’s already on it’s deathbed.  While you’re not a Game Boy user, and you yourself even stated that while you feel chip is your home that you see yourself more as an EDM artist, how do you feel about chip where it is now?  Does it feel healthy to you, or do you feel it’s starting to die out a bit too, or do you think this is just the beginnings of familiarity breeding -not necessarily contempt- but perhaps boredom?  Boredom of seeing the same people perform or on the dance floor?What’s your take on this?

Decktonic:  Man, people have been playing pianos for centuries and I still like to hear a piano when I can!  I think when people put forth these kinds of sentiments, like, “chipmusic is dead!” they need to put a big “IN MY OPINION” at the front of it.  I think before you can even get the words out of your mouth, some kid you’ve never even heard of is going to come along with a Game Boy and play something that will catch your attention.  If people are tired of chip music, they can go elsewhere.  I’m still having a good time.

Kuma:  I’m definitely glad you are having a good time, because that means a lot more music from you, as well as just the general enjoyment of your company at these venues (although, admittedly, it has been some time since I’ve seen you.)  That being said, Mr Montoya, I know there’s a lot more that could be said and could be asked about you, including about your other projects such as Miami Slice (which I still don’t believe exists, just like Ricky Brugal), but I think here’s a good spot to end the interview. Before we go, do you have any closing statements or remarks you’d like to make?

Decktonic:  I don’t know if that answers your question at all, but to answer it directly: “LA LA LA LA CAN’T HEAR YOU CAN’T YOU SEE I’M LISTENING TO RICKY BRUGAL GO AWAY.”

Kuma:  Hahahahaha!  Wonderful!  Christian, thank you very much for this interview and for a little more insight about you and your views on this wonderful scene we’re in.  I look forward to conversing with you again.

Decktonic:  Same! Oh, wait!  I missed that last question!  One sec!  I’m trying to think if I do have any actual last words… Oh!  Just, I’m always looking to meet more people that love chip music, so if you see me at a show, say hello!  That is all.

Kuma:  I’ll definitely pass it along.  I have to admit this makes an amusing little addendum to our interview.

Decktonic: ha ha OK!  Yeah the LA LA LA part was in response to the second to last question!

Kuma:  But it worked so well for the last one, though!

Dectonic: LOL NO!

Kuma: Lol!
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Hope you guys enjoyed the interview!  Tune in next week as I take the time to talk to CompyCore, a chiptune artist and entrepreneur that’s looking to make a name for himself in fashion and in chiptune!

‘Til next time.
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Relevant Links:
Decktonic on Bandcamp
Miami Slice on Soundcloud
Superpowerless on Bandcamp
Korg DS-10

christian montoya

ChipWin-tern Bonus Spotlight: Optimus Chad

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WHOA, TWO IN ONE WEEK‽ WHAT IS THIS SHENAINGANRY‽ I’ll tell you what it is – making up for lost time. And how fortuitous that we should need to make up for lost time now, as our good friend Optimus Chad just dropped an album on Valentine’s Day. But before we get into that, let’s get to know the man behind the machine behind the chipthrash behind the music, shall we?

Chad Roose, aka Optimus Chad, is half of the team behind Datathrash Recordings, and has been putting out chiptunes for two years (“almost as long as I’ve been listening to them,” says Chad). He was actually one of the kind souls who had contacted me about my previous endeavor, the chiptune paper (some of you might remember that – if not, don’t worry, because it’s not out yet!), and as such I had a fairly in depth interview with him. I’d like to give you some excerpts from that interview now.

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ChipWin-tern Spotlight: MrWimmer

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Happy Valentnes Day, ChipWinners! I hope you all are having a fun and safe V-Day, but everyone knows you need a soundtrack to go along with today, right? Well it just so happens that our next artist has done just that for you – but more on that later.

This time around, we’re going for someone who’s been a longtime member of the Facebook group, Alex Wimmer! MrWimmer from Lexington, Kentucky, is fairly new on the scene, having only been doing chiptunes professionally for two and a half years. In terms of musical schooling though, he’s been singing and playing guitar for a while now, and like many chiptuners, has taught himself LSDJ. In addition, he has recently started using the tracker DefleMask, in order to start writing some tasty Genesis-based jams. (The Sega system, not the 80’s band.)  He actually did the mastering on a little of his work, but has said he probably won’t for any upcoming releases due to time constraints. So, without further ado, let’s jump in on his music, shall we?

Let’s start with Stranger, which is my favorite track of his so far because it’s so solid. I believe I’ve expressed elsewhere that I’m more a fan of my chiptunes sans vocals, but Alex does quite well at integrating his vocals into the mixes, and especially with this track. The drums in the beginning set you up for this track, letting you know that you’re going to be in for something good.

And then you get something like Afraid, from his newer album. It’s a tad more atonal (the whole album is, really), but that’s not a bad thing – it gives him a really unique sound. And then you get something like…this.

It’s rough, it’s raw, it’s “got enough reverb to kill an elephant” as Wimmer says himself, and it’s a great culmination to the album.

And since it is Valentines Day, it would be remiss if I didn’t mention Wimmer’s new three track release, especially for today. Quoth Wimmer:
“The first one is old, the second one’s new,
The last one is borrowed, all wrapped up in blue,
A bigger release on on it’s way soon,
Till then MrWimmer hopes to Make You Swoon.”

If you like MrWimmer, you should probably get your buttocks in the general vicinity of BRKFest, because he’ll be there! I’ll be there! You’d better be there, or I’ll whomp you one but good, codsarn it!

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Links below. (Zeldas above! Get it?! DO YOU GET IT?! I don’t get it, that’s why I was asking.)
Facebook
Soundcloud
Bandcamp

Make You Swoon