Posts Tagged ‘collectives’

This Month in The Overworld: Cinematronic

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Cinematronic's portrait by Pixel Syndrome.
Cinematronic’s portrait by Pixel Syndrome.

Ciro Mendoza is, in his everyday life, a 37 year old Information Technology professor, Software Developer and a Student of Multimedia and Sound and image careers. From the bowels of the west of Buenos Aires, Merlo, he can never stay still: he has also worked as a columnist for the video games section at a local culture mag known as ‘Los Inrockuptibles’ (a branch that previously existed in Argentina, that stemmed from the french magazine ‘Les Inrockuptibles‘) and participated in a project (that never came to fruition) trying to develop a game based in the popular argentinian comic book “El Eternauta” (The Eternaut).

With his chiptune project, going by the name of Cinematronic, all of this geeky exterior explodes into a punkish rage of noise, as I realized when witnessing his live shows. He is everything but meek. He sometimes makes me wonder what would have happened if The Stooges had incorporated chiptune music created to go alongside to the beats of Iggy’s frenetic and contorsionated stage moves from the 70’s.

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ChipWIN-tern Spotlight: Battle of the Bits

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If there’s one thing all of us at the blog stand for, it’s making sure that the chiptune community stays healthy and happy and continues to grow.

And baked goods. We stand for a happy, healthy, growing community and baked goods.

And dank memes. …alright look, so among the things we stand for are a happy, healthy, growing community, baked goods and dank memes. [Hoodie’s note: and beer. Don’t forget beer. Beer > memes tbh.] But while we share a lot about the last few, sometimes we neglect to take the time to report on happenings going on in and around the greater chip community outside of our general purview (i.e. outside of ChipWIN in general, as damn, there’s a lot going on there as is!).

And thus I’d like to take a moment to chat with you about Battle of the Bits.

97f909b671d222251507a8111ea2866b_original (more…)

Hoodie Highlights… Sam Wray!

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Sup y’all? =) President Hoodie here with the first Hoodie Highlights of 2016! Woohoo! =D

Getting things rolling along nicely for the new year, today’s feature is with one of my favorite “doers” in chiptune. A young Brit I had the pleasure of finally working with last year, and who has already accomplished more in chiptune than he really has any right to at his age. Of course I’m talking about Sam Wray aka 2xAA! Enjoy!

Photo of 2xAA by Egor Alimpiev.

Photo of 2xAA by Egor Alimpiev.

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The Post-MAG MAG-packed MAGFest 13 Post

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The UK may have Superbyte, the Netherlands may have EINDBAAS, but here near the United States’ capital, we have a little thing called MAGFest, and we like to think it does alright.  While many of you came out and attended MAGFest with us from all over the globe (attendance surpassed 17,000 people this year!), I know there are many of you who were not able to. And if I’m honest with you, even those of us who DID go couldn’t have gone to everything that there was to do there unless the Ministry of Magic had given out Time Turners to the lot of us. That’s where this post comes in – I’ve done my best to assemble all the links, videos and pictures of the most happening happenings to have happened. Those of you who remember my Post-PAX PAX Post should be familiar with how I’m going to format this: As this was the Music and Gaming Festival, we’re going to have a #Music and a #Gaming section as well as a #Closing Thoughts, tagged as such for easy navigation within the post.

Pictured: Adam Martinez, Hot 'n Ready for MAGFest

Are you Hot ‘n Ready for this? Kuma is.

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Sladerfluous Reviews: ‘Monochrome’ by tiasu

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Hit play on ‘Macro’ below and prepare to dance. Welcome to ‘Monochrome’ by tiasu.

‘Monochrome’ by tiasu is an eight track chip-dance album that knows itself inside and out, expressing high-powered, strikingly danceable beats with a confidence that demands the attention it deserves. Labyrinthine amalgamations of familiar chip sounds and welcoming dance rhythms work in tandem to ensnare your attention immediately, with the above track ‘Macro’ being a remarkable example of tiasu’s artistic execution of electronic music.

monochrome by tiasu

‘Monochrome’ is a solid chip-dance album of eight tightly cohesive tracks ordered to deliver a satisfying night on the dance floor, which this album provides in spades.

Savvy employment of familiar chip sounds fused together with welcoming dance beats blur the lines between traditional electronica and classic chiptune, allowing fans of each genre a dynamic album everyone can embrace, exposing listeners to the highlights of both music categories. Breakdowns within ‘Spectrum’, for example, delve into a dub-step vibe that benefits greatly from the particular chip sounds tiasu has chosen, creating a unique “lighter” dub-step riff that melds fantastically with the album’s established tone.

The final ‘Monochrome’ track ‘Focus’ takes the furthest departure from the album’s dancebeat themes with the integration of a grunge bass through line, experimenting with a dark and gripping electronica sound moulded around a melody more akin to the rest of the album.

With a presentation as strong as ‘Monochrome’, insight into tiasu’s creative process is invaluable. Fortunately, tiasu was kind enough to spend some time sharing his experience constructing ‘Monochrome’, and that interview continues below:

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Pixel Recall: How close is Monochrome to your initial conception for the album in terms of composition, theme and tone?

tiasu: Monochrome developed very organically – I didn’t start out with any specific preconceived ideas of what I wanted the album to sound like, but after I debuted two tracks at a gig and saw the reaction they got, I knew I had a direction & sound I wanted to keep!

Pixel Recall: What’s your live set-up like? Do you have a favourite piece of hardware?

tiasu: My live setup is very minimal – I use a gameboy for one or two tracks, and the rest is all in Ableton, controlled with a launchpad and korg nanokontrol. Oh and there’s also a – quite frankly, ridiculous – bat onesie, which is critical to the whole setup!

Pixel Recall: It’s been less than a year since your release of “mission control”. What do you personally feel has been your largest growth piece artistically between last December’s “mission control”, and this year’s “Monochrome”?

tiasu: With every release (Monochrome is number 7!) I’m getting better at creating something more cohesive, for lack of a better word. Mission control is 9 cobbled together tracks, and the album’s track order is the same order that I wrote them. With Monochrome, there were a whole bunch of rejected tracks (some of which I’ve released elsewhere), that I didn’t include because they simply didn’t fit with the sound of the album. Technically, the mixing, mastering & overall production is getting better too – which is always nice, it can sometimes be hard to listen to the old tracks, the production value… Some of it is shocking!

Pixel Recall: Do you have a specific plan of attack when it comes to composing a new track, or do you find each track comes to you in its own way?

tiasu: Each track comes about very differently – sometimes you can sit there banging your head against the wall hoping to get some workable idea, other times you might start humming a tune and suddenly there’s a 5 minute track sitting there!

Pixel Recall: Do you have any tips or tricks for aspiring artists looking to perform live electronic music like yourself?

tiasu: Tips and tricks? Honestly, just keep doing it – have fun, enjoy the process of writing it, enjoy performing it. One of the best things I’ve ever done has to be a challenge called ‘Weekly Beats’, writing a track every week for a year. Not every track is good, in fact the majority of mine are done in a very short space of time and complete rubbish, but that’s half of the fun!

Pixel Recall: Open mic: Any last thoughts, shout-outs, advice, or tour dates you’d like to make sure to share with your fans?

tiasu: I’ve gotta thank Derris ‘Nine-finger’ Kharlan, GZom, Biko, Loubanging & Sean ‘Birdball’ O’Dowd for putting up with me, Cody Hargreaves, Chris De Cinque, cTrix, aday, Pselodux & Claire Plunkett for being awesome, Belinda Haas for all the good times, the amazing SoundBytes/SquareSounds crew for putting on awesome shows (and being such rad people), and of course Chiptunes=WIN! I’m 100% sure I’ve forgotten about a million people I should thank, sorry!

I’m playing at the SquareSounds ExpansionPAX gig on the 2nd November at Forgotten Worlds in Melbourne, and I may or may not have a sneaky new track to play too…

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‘Monochrome’ is cheerful, industrious, self-assured, and frankly music to groove to.

‘Monochrome’ by tiasu is available for download right now on Bandcamp, with pay-what-you-want pricing. ‘Monochrome is a must-listen, and if you can afford it, remember to support the artists you love so they can keep creating more of the music you love.

Pixel Recall (R. Morgan Slade) ~ Support the artists you love ~

tiasu:
facebook | twitter | soundcloud | bandcamp | tiasu.com

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Raw Cuts With Kuma! #1: SKGB

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Hey there, chipbros and sistas!  Welcome to the first edition of Raw Cuts with Kuma! What is Raw Cuts, you ask?  Well, Raw Cuts are unedited, candid interviews with some of the coolest, hippest minds in the chiptune scene!  From big stars to up-and-comers,  Raw Cuts was made to allow for a very in depth look at the thought processes of some of the artists, visualists, designers, and promoters in the scene, and maybe even a couple lols on occasion.

This first interview is one I did a while back with an artist who contributed to ChipWin’s very first compilation album, our 51 track beast of an LP.  I went into it wanting to get to know and understand this artist more, but I ended up also getting some advice from him on my road to becoming a fellow chiptuner.  Best known for his unique manipulation of noise, laid back demeanor, and dat luscious freakin hair, here’s my interview with Aleister M. Williams, the artist known as SKGB!


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Kuma: So, lets start with something basic.  Your stage name, SKGB. What was the inspiration for that? What does that stand for, anyway?

SKGB: Well… I basically needed to change my name from SOMETHING WHICH WILL NEVER BE MENTIONED AGAIN!  And I wanted it to sound “cool” I guess, so I took some words that meant something to me and I turned em into an acronym.  I’m sorry, but at this time my agent, Aleister Williams, will not permit me to reveal what SKGB stands for.

Kuma: Hahahaha fair enough, good sir.  That being said, what first got you into chiptune?  Had music production always been something that was a part of your life or did it come later in life?

SKGB: Well, when I was five I decided I wanted to be an artist ’cause I liked cutting the little stick people out all pretty-like.  For a while I wanted to be a visual artist of some sort, then I got into the art of play in middle school and designed shitty little indie games with some Swedish software.  Finally, I found my way into chiptunes, listened to everything I could on 8bitpeoples, started checking out tons of circuit bending stuffs, and smoked too much weed.  Why paint one painting, when i can paint a billion diff paintings in every different person’s ears?

Kuma: Very true!  Your music certainly has reached a wide audience, but I do have to admit you have a style all your own on stage.  It seems to me you definitely haven’t completely abandoned your need to express yourself as a visual artist, particularly when the art is you, such as during your recent show at 8static.  Care to elaborate more on the inspiration for that show?

SKGB: Well, Christmas is all corporate evil now, so I just figured i’d inject some electro-pagan-witch-funk into the mix of consumerist bullshit and see what happens.  Also, I jokingly put “An SKGB Christmas Special” onto the official 8static bookings a while back and Emily Feder (EMFEDEX, Chipmusic Chronicle) made me follow through.

Kuma: Hahahaha!  Oh dude you’re killing me!  That being said, lets talk a bit more about your music.  While there are a lot of chip artists who seem to find their groove after a while and seem to fit neatly into one sub genre, your music is just everywhere!  Hell that Xmas set alone had the dance floor alternating between grinding and thrashing to pop and locking faster than Saturday at Blipfest!  If you had to define you as an artist, what would you call yourself?

SKGB: Well I guess basstripnoisechipthrash or something like that.  My brain is constantly getting bored so I have to constantly keep doing new things to keep it occupied.

Kuma: Would you say that boredom, or a fear of it, is ultimately the driving force behind what you do?

SKGB: Not really.  To be honest I don’t know what boredom is anymore.  I wish I had time to know it, though.  Then maybe I could have more time for a good book and pipe and some pets or something.

Kuma: That’s honestly refreshing to hear, as boredom seems so pervasive in modern culture.  I regress, though.  Lets back track a bit though to your personal style of music. Are there any artists in particular that inspire you to do what you do,chip or otherwise?

SKGB: Yeah. A whole lot.  No but really, I guess, as a kid I listened to a lot of jazz (bebop, avant guard, swing) my mom had.  I grew up listening to stuff like Nirvana and Soundgarden and Alice in Chains and 1st wave ska, then a whole bunch of techno, then chiptunes, then dubstep (like 2008ish stuff).  Now I just listen to a whole buncha shit.
The artists who inspire me the most now are the ones i’m in close proximity with. Dino Lionetti (and all of Cheap Dinos).  The fellas on the Madwaves collective i chill with lots,
and stray chipthrashlings who make it up to Philly: Kool Skull, The Ghost Servant, S.P.R.Y.

Kuma: Very nice.  Kool Skull is one noise artist in particular I’ve come to enjoy greatly, in particular for something he said to me at his last show in NYC before moving out west. He said “the one thing you always gotta remember about chip is that chiptune is about making music easy.”  Would you find in your experience that sentiment to be true?  That making chiptune does make the music production process easier than if you had done it by more traditional means?

SKGB: It all depends.  Me and Kool Skull tend to have the complete opposite workflow when it comes to music. He likes to work on tracks real fast like, and I like to spend hours tweaking and tweaking (a song, you silly).  My advice would be, don’t let anyone else tell you how to make music.  I mean, personally, i’ll find any way i can to make any sort of music i can, because anything else would make me feel real sad ;_; traditional recording or tedious tracking, s’all good.

Kuma: Hey, its all good.  Like you said, this is about you doing what you love and what makes you happy.  You do that however you want my friend.  That being said, one last question for you.  You’ve been in the chipscene longer than I have. Seen its ups and downs, and have earned the respect and admiration of your peers and fans.  Over the course of the year, the chip scene has seen some incredible changes, from the rise of Chiptunes=Win to the farewell of Blipfest.  In your personal opinion as both a fan and an artist, what do you see yourself doing over the course of 2k13 and what do you think will come of the scene, as well?

SKGB: Well… I see myself making a whole bunch of music that doesn’t sound like “traditional” chipmusic, calling it chipmusic and pissing a whole bunch of people off (lol).
As for the “scene” as a whole, I don’t see an end to chipmusic in sight at all,
though i do believe the locus of chip hocus pocus has and will continue to stray farther from the east coast.  Going to BRKfest last year blew my mind wide open to the fact that yes: chipmusic is just as big, if not a whole fuckton bigger, than it ever was.  In fact, the entire midwest corridor is on hot fiyah, Piko Piko Detroit, Cartrage, BRKfest, and all the travelling artists in between are fucking shit up real proper over there.  But mark my words: the 8static crew still have a few surprises on their .sav roms.

aleister crowly

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Relevant awesome links:
SKGB on Bandcamp
SKGB on Facebook
Chip Music Chronicle
8Static
Piko Piko Detroit