Posts Tagged ‘PAX Prime’

Turbo Super Post-MAG MAG-Post 2017 & Knuckles Gaiden Day One Edition

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By the time you read this, everyone should be home and happy, well rested, without the MAGFlu and otherwise readjusted to real life. While I’m WRITING it, however, I’m drowning in posts from people in transit back to the dark corners of the world they crawled from so that they can go heal themselves. While this year’s MAGFest might have been the biggest one so far, it also seems to have taken the most from us in terms of bodily health, but only because everyone was incapable of having any degree of chill. Everyone basically just kept going until they were physically unable to go anymore, and even then they just kinda propped their bodies up in chairs so they could at least look like they were still going like some kind of knock-off ‘Weekend at Bernie’s.’ It was amazing. But enough talk – let’s have at this highlight reel!

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The Post-MAG MAG-packed MAGFest 13 Post

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The UK may have Superbyte, the Netherlands may have EINDBAAS, but here near the United States’ capital, we have a little thing called MAGFest, and we like to think it does alright.  While many of you came out and attended MAGFest with us from all over the globe (attendance surpassed 17,000 people this year!), I know there are many of you who were not able to. And if I’m honest with you, even those of us who DID go couldn’t have gone to everything that there was to do there unless the Ministry of Magic had given out Time Turners to the lot of us. That’s where this post comes in – I’ve done my best to assemble all the links, videos and pictures of the most happening happenings to have happened. Those of you who remember my Post-PAX PAX Post should be familiar with how I’m going to format this: As this was the Music and Gaming Festival, we’re going to have a #Music and a #Gaming section as well as a #Closing Thoughts, tagged as such for easy navigation within the post.

Pictured: Adam Martinez, Hot 'n Ready for MAGFest

Are you Hot ‘n Ready for this? Kuma is.

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Raw Cuts with Kuma #23: Alex Mauer

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Hey, what’s up everybody!  Welcome back to RCwK!  I’m BronxKuma — Kuma for short — and this time around I managed to get a hold of a bonafide legend!  A founding father of the Philly scene, this guy’s been making tracker music for nearly 20 years and is proof that time, dedication, and hard work doing something you love can pay off in the long run.  Here to talk to us about his journey through chip, some of his more recent and notable projects, and the future, I’m proud to present my interview with one of the very best artists the community has fostered: Alex Mauer!

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Chiptunes = WIN: Volume 3 [Tracks 27 – 31]

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Hey what’s up, ya’ll! It’s your boy BronxKuma, and today I’ll be taking the reigns as we continue our coverage of Chiptunes = WIN: Volume 3, which is the ninth compilation album we’ve put out in the past three years! Crazy, ain’t it? Time flies when you’re having fun though, and today, we’re gonna continue our fantastic aural voyage as I guide you through tracks 27-31 of this immaculate collection of music! Let’s get to it!


Vince Kaichan — In The Stars

This song is Vince’s third contribution to Chiptunes = WIN (technically 4th if I include the fact that one of those songs inspired a tear-jerking postrock cover by Cory Johnson) and there is a damn good reason for this. From the first time I heard him perform live during Frostbyte’s album release party in 2012 to the various tracks he’s contributed to ChipWIN, Vince has proven himself to be a deftly skilled composer, and this song is further proof of said musical aptitude. Diverging from from the playful, pure chip melody of his last contribution, In The Stars is a thoughtful, urban, subdued track that made me swear I was listening to Joshua Morse album. Perfect for unwinding after a long day, if In The Stars doesn’t fill you with mellow, you and I can never be friends.

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Shinoboy — Detruire

Proving that even the purest, simplest means of composing can produce high quality music, Shinoboy’s first contribution to ChipWIN lives up to it’s name in that it destroys everything! Starting out with a nostalgic arpeggio straight out of Link’s Awakening, the song opens up and becomes a fist throwing, shoulder thrusting, I’m-sorry-I-almost-gave-you-a-concussion-in-the-moshpit-at-8statifest-last-year-Auxcide head banger that feels like equal parts Unini and FearofDark. If you like your chiptune hard, dirty, and full of BRKs like it’s giving your day job the finger, blast this on repeat and revel in all the fucks you don’t have for anything.

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Polygon Horizon — Breath

Polygon Horizon’s offering to the compilation is another song whose title perfectly embodies what this song is in and of itself as well as what it is in relation to the tracks before and after it. Offering a brief reprieve after a few moments of pure idgaf, he has crafted a song that not only allows a moment of stillness, but slowly escalates into a song that inspires hope. In fact, the song does it so well that I had to ask during the listening party if this was the last track on the album, because the amount of nostalgia, tears and optimism it invokes is so striking it rivals even PROTODOME’s offerings for ending tracks on the previous annual compilations. Quite an accomplishment for an artist no matter who you are.

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Auxcide — Fateful Encounter

Another unfairly talented individual who is contributing a fourth time to ChipWIN, Auxcide’s track is the musical equivalent of a meeting between Yojimbo and Kozure Okami. On its own, it invokes the sense of desperation to cut down another, as well as the hatred two must have towards duel to clash so passionately. Combined with the songs before it, Fateful Encounter acts as the second slice of bread in a tasty, thoughtfully made sandwhich that allows one to enjoy the sharp tastes of the moshpitstravaganzas both this and Detruire have, but further accentuates itself and the subtle pallet cleanser that Breath was. This allows all three songs to stand on their own and truly seems unique, despite being part of a larger whole. If you were looking for another reason to throw elbows, let Auxcide take you to the promise land.

By the way, Auxcide, I’d like to apologize again for almost giving you a concussion last year at 8staticfest.  Sorry.

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sleepytimejesse — ❁♡Kawaii Implosion♡❁

Gracing us with his second appearance on a Chiptunes = WIN compilation, sleepytimejesse shows off his creativity with a song that combines a sense of humor, style and even a nod to a classic R&B hit all rolled into a nice lil morsel of a tune.  From the pleasantly unexpected urban flair that strays from his normal compositional style to the use of everyone’s favorite musical canine–K.K. Slider– this low tempo chiptune is the kind of stuff I’d really love to hear more of in the scene.  The kind of song that, despite some of its sillier flairs, resonates with fashionable goodness such as Vince Kaichan’s aforementioned “In The Stars” and Joshua Morse’s “Just Missed You” off of Chiptunes = WIN Vol. 2.  If you haven’t listened to sleepytimejesse before now, I highly suggest changing that pronto.  The man is not one to disappoint regardless of what genre he chooses to dabble in.

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Well guys, it’s time for my leg of the tour through ChipWIN Vol 3 to come to an end. I hope you enjoyed your time with me and that I helped make this part of the album as memorable as the one’s before it. I now bid you adieu, and would like to remind you to check back with us tomorrow as my friend Aydan takes over as captain of our musical escapades, as he’ll be guiding us through tracks 32-26 with considerably more skill than me. I hope. >.>;

Keep on chippin’, and don’t forget: Kuma loves you.

Peace!

\m| (=^(t)^=) |m/

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Sladerfluous: ‘Distant Reality’ by Shirobon

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You have to hear this album.

Press play below to fall in love with this powerful foray into 80s electronica, ‘Distant Reality’ by Shirobon.

Distant Reality by Shirobon

Released to the masses on Bandcamp February 4th, 2014, Shirobon’s ‘Distant Reality’ is a compact, delicious delve into cyberpunk that infuses you with flowing 80s-inspired synth, weighty bass lines and thoughtful lyrics.

The improvisational nature of the tracks in ‘Distant Reality’ do so much more than simply keep you guessing, they weave inspired transitions together with tell-tale 80s synth to set a mysterious cyberpunk mood that will make you wonder the results of your Voight-Kampff test.

‘Distant Reality’ is a set of 5 killer tracks that waste no time getting down into an 80s groove, embracing it with every single note. This is not a gimmick tacked onto a hacked-together string of ideas, the precision of execution and respect for the era come through loud and clear.

Impressive vocals across the album truly add to the atmosphere including Shirobon himself lending his own robotic vocals to “Regain Control”, “Perfect Machine” and “City Patrol (Stage B)”. “Immune”, however, introduces you to the world Shirobon has created with the unexpected and absolutely alluring vocals of Camden Cox. The weight of the lyrics equal the depth of the bass lines, and the result is beyond immersive.

‘Distant Reality’ tows melodies through inspired funk and synth elements with a directed, yet unpredictable approach to its composition: each change and volley into each new element during a given track on ‘Distant Reality’ feels like the most appropriate direction to shift into, but you simply don’t see it coming. Polished, experimental, and focused, ‘Distant Reality’ is a refreshing exploration of tone and theme in a sea of heartless electronica that deserves your £3 investment.

Shirobon was gracious enough to answer a few questions about his experiences building ‘Distant Reality’, and that interview continues below:
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PixelRecall: Camden Cox’s vocals on “Immune” are gripping. How did the opportunity to work with her come about?

Shirobon: Thanks! I have actually known Camden Cox for quite some time. She also did vocals some time ago on my song “Running My Head“. She is a very talented vocalist! I have also produced a group of songs for her which will be released throughout the year!

PixelRecall: Where did you draw inspiration for your lyrics across the album?

Shirobon: These days I like to look up a lot of imagery before starting work on songs. I wanted to go for a Cyberpunk/Futuristic feel while keeping cool and introducing chiptune elements (More of the c64/Sega style) so naturally the lyrics reflect on that.

PixelRecall: The songs on ‘Distant Reality’, most notably with “Cyber Party”, have an engaging, almost improvisational feel to them. What is your creative process like when composing your music?

Shirobon: Well, when I work on a song I like to consider it jamming with myself (or in the case of “Cyber Party” with Radix!). So I would usually come up with some drums or a melody idea and then just jam over them. If it starts to sound good then I hit the record button and take it from there!

PixelRecall: Are you performing the vocals on “Regain Control”?

Shirobon: Yes, I’m a sucker for robotic vocals and love to use my voice when I can! (Also, it’s my voice on “Perfect Machine” and “City Patrol (Stage B)”.

PixelRecall: Did you have a “eureka” moment during the creation of the album you may not have expected to have?

Shirobon: I was having some trouble with “City Patrol (Stage B)” and couldn’t get it to feel good. It started off as a guitar/electro disco number. Before I gave up I thought I would make some changes and plugged in my modular synth and made some chip sounds, from there everything fell into place!

PixelRecall: Do you have a favourite memory from your experiences performing live?

Shirobon: I have had a lot of really fun times performing live and the crowds are always pretty intense, but i think one that stands out the most is when I had a large wall of death and saw this massive dude drop kick a girl in the face! But thankfully she was fine!

PixelRecall: Do you have any shows coming up?

Shirobon: I have a few! Playing at Nintendoom in Belgium which will be a lot of fun. I have quite a few coming up around Europe but i have yet to announce those…

PixelRecall: Any advice for aspiring chiptune artists?

Shirobon: Do it because you love it, not because you wanna make it (big). Popularity in the scene comes and goes but the artists that people love are the ones who have always loved to make (music) and not felt to give it up.

PixelRecall: What was your main goal when you set out to create Distant Reality, and do you feel like you accomplished it?

Shirobon: I just wanted to make something a little different from the generic releases that are out there at the moment, and not to try and jump on a trend and make some kind of bass music! I reckon I did a good job!

PixelRecall: Any final thoughts or news you’d like to share with the Chiptunes = WIN community?

Shirobon: Back Tracking and Distant Reality I consider to be warm up releases to show people what my sounds is like now. With them released I’m going to start work on an album! Still planning what sort of songs I want on it but it’s gonna be a journey that crosses over the sounds of chiptune and synthesizers!
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Big thanks to Shirobon for taking time out for the interview!

Now go grab your copy of ‘Distant Reality’ on Bandcamp right now before the next time you hang with your friends so that when they’re like, “Have you heard of Shirobon?” you can be like, “Know him? I have Distant Reality on repeat!”

Pixel Recall ~ (R. Morgan Slade) ~ Support the artists you love

Shirobon
Facebook | Twitter | Bandcamp | Soundcloud

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Sladerfluous: ‘LUST’ by Meishi Smile

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Lust - Meishi Smile

Juxtaposed in the eye of the storm between high-energy and ambience, LUST by Meishi Smile charges peaceful melodies with energetic electronic pop to create an engaging, contemporary album. Meishi Smile recently performed live at this year’s Frequency 3.0, lending his track “Honey” to the Frequency 3.0 Artist Sampler compilation album embedded below.

I highly suggest you press play.

“Honey” showcases Meishi Smile’s J-Pop influences and ability to weave emotion into contemporary electronic music. Whispers of cryptic lyrics may catch your attention throughout LUST; subtle windows into Meishi Smile’s state of mind during the creation of the album.

LUST flows from track to track with an ever-evolving stream of synth-laced electronica. The marriage of energetic melodies and cool, breezy ambience in this latest offering from Meishi Smiles makes for an alluring album of tracks that nuzzle into your brain-space and will stay with you for days.

LUST by Meishi Smile is set to release Jan. 28th, and pre-orders (in both physical and digital forms) are available here. [Edit: Album is RELEASED!! Stream below! =D ]

I was able to steal a few precious minutes from Meishi Smile for a few questions, and that interview continues below:

Pixel Recall: Hoodie tells me you rocked Frequency this year. What was it like performing at Frequency? Are you a fan of performing live? Do you have any upcoming live events we should know about?

Meishi Smile: I went to Frequency last year primarily due to see my pal Pedro in Slime Girls perform. It was the first time I met him, as well as Jami from Space Boyfriend and Thymine/Grace, who illustrates under the names Tochiimint and Mahoushoughost. I had a really great time with them, and I guess I’m mentioning such an encounter because it’s made Frequency this really symbolic thing of friendship to me, that looking back at meeting these people one year ago and being extremely close to them now, it’s reinforced a lot of what I believe in with my life and what I do creatively.

Frequency itself though is amazing. I haven’t been involved with those creating chiptune music for that long, but I’ve quickly discovered all the amazing underground artists in the scene who definitely deserve a lot more attention. Being amongst those people was a great feeling this year. It’s still a very small thing, but it’s definitely growing by the year and I think a lot of chiptune music is really in the spirit of punk rock. Just the general idea of chiptune to me has always seemed like that, and sort of rebellious in a way. A generation of kids growing up with video games and gadgets, a lot of them being told that it’s a waste of time by their peers, yet turning around and utilizing those things to do something that’s very creative. 

My performance at Frequency was the first time I sang live and performed all original stuff. Usually I put a lot of remixes into my sets and have been in situations where I’ve felt the need to play only music that people can dance to, but I felt like this was a good opportunity to finally explore something much more in tune with my emotions. It’s definitely been the most meaningful set I’ve done so far, and I hope to continue to perform more shows like this in a similar vein.

I’ll be doing an online release party with my friends at SPF420, and DJing for this event set to celebrate the release of a zine dedicated to Yasutaka Nakata (producer of capsule, Kyary Pamyu Pamyu, Perfume). Aside from that, I have some out of state gigs coming soon and some surprises I can’t announce yet. I’m always looking to play more shows!

Pixel Recall: Tell me about ZOOM LENS! How you got involved with them, how it has affected your music making/reaching out to fans/getting your music out there?

Meishi Smile: I actually founded ZOOM LENS and I’ve been doing it since around 2009, although there are some gaps where I took a year or two off since I had some moments where I lost heart in the project.

I originally created it in intention to primarily release noise music (I had a project back then called Yuko Imada that did harsh noise and ambient music), but then I met my friend Kyle, who was currently performing as Class of 1923 (his latest project is called Uio Loi). It opened me up to the idea of working with other people, and soon I met more people online and began to create a little network of like-minded people whose music I enjoyed and personalities and drive I respected and it started to blossom from there.

I use the term “digital punk rock spirit” in correlation with ZOOM LENS a lot. I guess to me that sort of means this community of people I’ve met online who are operating on a sort of level of subversive interests and ideals and that I want others outside of the music to identify with who we are as well. 

For instance, with what I do with MEISHI there is a large degree of me being influenced by J-Pop and Anime culture, and I want to make that sort of thing approachable to others and something that one can be proud of liking. I think Tumblr and some other social media venues have made such things as this sort of ironic meme-worthy kind of thing. Even though that sort of culture has become more acceptable it’s still this kind of weird, uncool thing in a way. Ultimately I’m happy though that my music seems to fit underneath a wide variety of contexts and people who don’t even like that sort of stuff can at least be introduced to it on the musical/emotional level that I present it as, and possibly understand how that sort of thing has more substance than it’s taken for.

Not all of ZOOM LENS is even into stuff like that though, but I guess I use that as an example as ZOOM LENS trying to be something that represents a wide variety of interests, yet sort of comes together as this identifiable and unified whole due to this community of friends who just simply believe in what they believe in and do it.

Pixel Recall: During the production of LUST, did you discover a new favorite way of building/creating your music? 

Meishi Smile: LUST is still a really weird record to me because it’s not what I intended to initially make MEISHI SMILE into. Like I mentioned, I used to record a lot of noise and ambient music and I really wanted to completely move away from that. 

My initial goal was simply to create electronic pop music, and I was listening to a lot of production by Yasutaka Nakata at the time and the first Ravex album- that’s sort of what I wanted to do. 

But as I went through different emotional experiences, I found myself making the album that would end up being LUST and I ended up channeling different influences and ended up making something that musically, I feel takes my influence from Shoegaze, J-Pop, Noise, as well as elements of music such as Happy Hardcore. 

So I guess my discovery was that things can always change from your set intentions, and you should be open to that. What ultimately matters is that you successfully create something that channels who you and what you feel, and with LUST I think I really captured the feelings I had in those particular moments.

Pixel Recall: During the production of LUST, were there any unique challenges that you found yourself having to overcome? How were you able to overcome that challenge, and how did it help to shape the final release?

Meishi Smile: I initially released a low-key cassette version of it on Orchid Tapes, and since then I’ve grown more comfortable with who I am and what I do and how I record music, both on an emotional and a technical level. I suppose my challenge that came after I made that initial version was that I wanted to make it sound more like what I wanted on the level of finding more appropriate sounds and mixing the record better. The structure was there, but I felt sort of unsatisfied with what it was a few months later after its release. All that sort of grew with time, and after I released my EP with Maltine Records I had a lot more confidence to start doing things again and LUST slowly became the product it is now, which I’m much more proud of and finally happy to say I can close this chapter of my life.

Pixel Recall: Do you have a favourite technique or specific way/program you prefer to employ when making music? It could be a program, a way of organizing your thoughts, the way you create a given track, etc?

Meishi Smile: My approach to creating music isn’t really based on that much technical skill. I’ve played guitar since I was like 12, but I never learned any theory or how to read music and I’ve only fiddled with the piano since I started making music for MEISHI. I guess in saying that, most of how I make music simply comes from personal experiences that I try best to put into musical form. I find sounds by reflecting upon those experiences and thinking of the texture that brings out that particular mood. 

A lot of those sounds are reflective of a lot of 90’s Nintendo video games, stuff I’d heard as a kid. I think I say that on a very general level because I like video games, but I’m not completely knowledgeable either now at my age. I would hole myself up and had little friends when I was young, so I would no doubt enjoy the textures in games like Bomberman 64 or Mystical Ninja Goemon, very “Japanese” sort of melodies, but that’s all I have. I think that sense of separation reflecting on something that I am so contrastingly close to and also removed from helps create a sound that some people have told me is kind of “nostalgic.”

Pixel Recall: Your style embraces a light, energetic, positive ambience. What draws you to this style? Do you have any specific influences? What is your favourite way to explore this particular style when you’re making music? 

Meishi Smile: I think it all goes back to being influenced by a lot of Japanese music. There’s a particular moment in time that really influenced me in the way that I write, and it was when a friend of mine passed away in High School. During that time I had seen the movie Bright Future, and I really enjoyed the closing song “Mirai” which was by The Back Horn. I always felt a sort of message with that song. A sort of walking into the unknown, never retracing the steps of the past and simply saying goodbye to those moments with a sense of both heaviness and optimism. When I read the lyrics, they were very similar to what I had felt, it really hit me in a profound way. It was sort of the confirmation I needed when listening to foreign music that much of it is in the emotion, and from that emotion you can sometimes even sense something much more literal (such as the lyrics, in this case).

So with MEISHI SMILE I try my best to convey what I can in the abstract. Although I include lyrics to my songs, they’re not what I said when I recorded them. Most of the melodies and lyrics I make are simply me hitting record and singing stream of conscious. I don’t know what I said then, and the lyrics I use later are simply a placeholder that vaguely capture the emotion of what I felt. I hope that something can be felt despite what is read or heard. I think I want to just make something that is transcendent of the standard conventions of how you’re supposed to listen to music. I don’t meant that all in a pretentious way, but when I was listening to Japanese music as a kid, people would insultingly ask me “why?” That “if you can’t understand what they say, why bother listening?” To me, it’s because something can be felt. And I’m not sure why that isn’t a good enough reason for listening to music sometimes.

Pixel Recall: Do you have any advice for aspiring musicians?

Meishi Smile: Interpret your influences through your own state of mind and allow that to inspire what you truly want to create as an individual.

Pixel Recall: Is there anything else you’d like to leave our readers with?

Meishi Smile: Thanks for reading my rants all the time.

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Huge thanks to Meishi Smile for taking the time to so eloquently answer those questions.

Get in on the ground floor and snag your pre-order for LUST here!

Pixel Recall ~ (R. Morgan Slade) ~ Support the artists you love

Relevant Links:

Meishi Smile:
Pre-Order | Soundcloud | BandcampFacebook | Twitter | Tumblr

Zoom-Lens (Netlabel):
Website

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