Posts Tagged ‘Space Town Savior’

Chip Treatment with Professor Oakes: ‘Ghost Stories’ by Together We Are Robots

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Through my stay here on the ChipWIN Blog, I’ve written many album reviews about a handful of talented musicians, and thus a plethora of eclectic coverage has emerged. Through this journey, where I once started as a novice but passionate listener, I feel pretty confident in my ability to decipher the thoughts in my head as to why I think something sounds great. While I am not a classically trained musician, or studied music theory, or even identify as a musician (…yet), I have become much more constructive when I listen to an album. Leading up to this very album review today, I tend to gravitate toward releases that satisfy a minimum of three requirements: Personality, Composition, and Mixing—and I can very confidently say that these very three things are ubiquitous throughout ‘Ghost Stories’, Together We Are Robots’ first studio album released through Bandcamp on March 11, 2015. (more…)

ChipWIN-tern Spotlight: ‘Nebulae’ by Space Town Savior

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Here we are in a post Leonard Nimoy world, and all I (or anyone else it seems) can think about is space. People are constantly talking about Mars and what new things they find on it. Or there’s the dwarf planet Ceres, or this Earthlike planet Kepler 186-f. Hell, even ‘The X-Files’ is coming back to TV – so how fitting that Space Town Savior’s new (and final!) release ‘Nebulae’ is hot space-on-space, atmospheric trancey electronic goodness. You may, remember Space Town Savior from Volume 1 of our compilations – how wonderful it is now to get to talk about a full album instead of a single track!

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Chip Treatment with Professor Oakes: ‘The Mineral Kingdom’ by The Mineral Kingdom

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While I’m sure many agree with the sentiment that their musical taste fluctuates often (and sometimes very rapidly), mine is especially the case when it comes to chipmusic. Due to the wide and oversaturated market filled to the brim with talent new and old, I’m always looking for new and exciting releases that push the boundaries of what these small (but mighty) sequencers and instruments are able to produce—as my article archive can attest. With releases sprouting up left and right, it’s quite a grueling, difficult journey to sift through them in order to find one in which I connect with on more levels than I can explain. However, when that does happen, I feel like I’ve hit a gold mine, and this is especially the case with with The Mineral Kingdom, Oakland’s first chipjazz/doom metal/bluegrass/
chamber music band, and their self-titled first EP. (more…)

Chip Treatment with Professor Oakes: ‘SPACE FUGITIVES’ by TORIENA

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Greetings, readers! Boy oh boy has my life been a whirlwind of craziness lately! If it’s not helping organize the Los Angeles SHADOWTRAVEL tour stop with NullsleepStagediver, Starpause, and Trash80, a free E3 party with Japan’s legendary Chibi-Tech at a local barcade in Downtown Los Angeles with Meishi Smile, Space BoyfriendSpace Town Savior, Timon Marmex, and Trash80, or attending not ONE but TWO Anamanaguchi concerts within the same weekend (at the El Rey Theatre in Los Angeles and the DNA Lounge in San Francisco) respectively, it’s planning additional 8bitLA events, dreaming about attending out-of-state concerts like BRKFEST, and moving into a new apartment — I swear! I DO work full-time on top of all of this!

Despite all this crazy shenanigans, it’s good to be back writing this album review for this wonderful blog. I’m here to administer another dose of Chip Treatment the Professor Oakes way, and it is with great pleasure that I bring you a review of ‘SPACE FUGITIVES’ by TORIENA — so sit tight and read up!

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Released by MADMILKY RECORDS, a Kyoto Japan-based label founded by TORIENA and NNNNNNNNNN (pronounced as no-no-no-no-no-no-no-no-no-no) in 2013, ‘Space Fugitives’ is a REMARKABLE album released through Bandcamp on January 28, 2014. Beginning her career as a composer and a performing chip musician in 2012 (she’s also an illustrator and web designer!), Sae Shimizu (TORIENA) released her first EP entitled “ORBIT” through Vol.4 Records, and later ‘Black Dance Hole’, her first 10-track album, later that year. Exclusively using her front-lit DMGs and LSDJ to create the music and running it through Cubase 6 (she also uses a Behringer Pro Mixer VMX100USB), Shimizu has dug herself a spot in the chip scene as one of the best international acts, as she performed during Blip Festival Tokyo 2012 at Koenji High in Tokyo (alongside AbortifacientAliceffekt, Batsly Adams, Bit Shifter, Chibi-Tech, Covox, and Nullsleep to name a few) and was awarded ‘Best New Artist’ in the World Wide Chiptune Awards, according to her website.

With energizing stage presence (as this video of TORIENA performing at Blip Tokyo 2012 can attest), Shimizu’s passion for music began with her parents (her father is a DJ) and her enrollment in junior high band (Shimizu played tuba, double bass, and bass guitar). Shimizu began her journey in electronic music in junior high after discovering Kraftwerk and Daft Punk, and later Gold Panda and Squarepusher in high school, but remarks her interest in music is “quite fickle because the mood at the time can change.” (ICON.jp, January 17, 2014)

Receiving wide support from Pedro Silva of Slime Girls and Shane Banegas (watashimo), and featured on DJ Cutman‘s ‘This Week in Chiptune‘ on February 19, 2014, ‘SPACE FUGITIVES’ opens with ‘Fetal movement’, as TORIENA creates an memorable, rhythmic introduction to the album at large. The calmer precursor to the latter half of the album, ‘Fetal movement’ is surely the calm before the storm. With BPMs ranging from the upper 110’s to lower 130’s as it starts to take speed, ‘Fetal movement’ is a brilliant example of dreamy, low-fi tracks that produce a sense of nostalgia, as Shimizu includes the Gameboy start-up sound as an element to the track, and a drone element which she pitch bends (which reminds me a lot of the sound the cars make upon accelerating in RoadBlasters and an element that The Depreciation Guild used quite often.) Another stylistic choice (whether intentional or not), is the slight humming her DMGs make throughout the course of the track—if you listen carefully, you can hear panning clicks laid on top of the melody she creates using her pulse channels, and the hi hats in her noise channel. There’s nothing more appealing than the true, natural sound a DMG can make, and I could never understand why artists would ever want to hide that!

‘Call me again!’, very appropriately mastered near the conclusion of ‘SPACE FUGITIVES’, is one of my absolute favorite tracks on this album. Sitting at just about 3 minutes long, the track throws you through a tornado of emotions as soon as it commences. Oozing at the seams with an unforgettable j-pop vibe, Shimizu mimics Mario’s jump and fire flower sound elements, which she very strategically places throughout the track. Leading up to about the 55 second mark, ‘Call me again!’ is a wonderful example of Shimizu’s ability to masterfully build up the emotion of the track using a rather static BPM and glitch-like elements, to then launch the listeners into a whirlwind of adrenaline-pumping elements and a much quicker tempo. Uplifting, hyper, and incredibly fun, ‘Call me again!’ sends me on a wild cat and mouse chase as I truly feel like I’m not able to rest until the conclusion of the track. Unlike its precursor ‘Fetal movement’, ‘Call me again!’ is far from anything calm, soothing, and dreamy (but rather insane and wild!)

‘SPACE FUGITIVES’ can be purchased through Bandcamp digitally for $8. This is an album I definitely recommend buying (if you haven’t already!) as I assure you it’ll make your way to your list of top favorites. While TORIENA has not yet performed in the western hemisphere, she tells ICON.jp that she would very much like to perform outside of Japan in the future—so keep your eyes out and catch her performing when this happens!

That’s all ChipWIN readers! Until next time on Chip Treatment—Professor Oakes signing off!

Toriena
Bandcamp | Facebook | Illustrations | Soundcloud | Twitter | Tumblr | Website

MADMILKY RECORDS
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Raw Cuts with Kuma #20: Chema64 & Atoms or Faeries (of 56KBPS Records)

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Welcome back to Raw Cuts, ChipWINners!  First and foremost, I’d like to take the time to thank you all for stickin with me over the past few months!  This is my 20th edition of RCwK and to help celebrate this special occasion, I decided to do something special and interview not one, but two very awesome artists who not only run an incredible netlabel, but have recently put out a stellar compilation that’s a celebration for them as well!

5 years ago, Chema64 founded 56KBPS, Mexico’s premier chiptune netlabel!  While his start off was small, with only a handful of artists contributing at first, Chema64 would soon be joined by another awesome artist by the name of Atoms or Faeries!  Working together, they not only put out albums that do the chipscene in their neck of the world justice, but they would go on to found and curate a chiptune music festival called Format.DF: a 3 day event that would go on to be the Blipfest of Latin America!

To celebrate, commemorate and immortalize the beauty of that festival and achievements thus far, the guys put out a bombastic 30 track compilation that manages to set itself apart from other chiptune/lofi comps over the past 2 years by being dynamic, diverse, culturally flavorful and easily accessible!  From the grimey sounds of Crab Sound’s “Nooby Clairvoyence” to the intermittent wubs of Coleco Music’s “Irak Undo” to the trance/house korg inspired goodness of Anwar Sanchez’s “What’s I O”, there is literally something on this album for everyone.  In short, this is one of the few times where an album so lovingly captures lightning in a bottle that the sum of the parts is truly equal to the whole.

But don’t take my word for it; sit back and relax with it as I take the time to talk to Chema64 and Atoms or Faeries about their music, the scene, the album and what comes next for them.


Kuma:  So lets get started at the beginning.  How’d you guys first get started in chiptune and how did you two meet each other?

Atoms or Faeries (AoF):  Would you like to go first Chema?

Chema64:  I accidentally came across chipmusic in 2005, I don’t even remember how, but the first chiptune I heard was by Tugboat. I made my first tunes by 2007 and in 2009 I founded 56KBPS Records, because there were no Spanish-speaking presence at the time.  I met Marco (Aof) in 2013.  He’s only been part of the net label since 2014 but so far he has been a invaluable piece to the label.

Kuma:  I think that’s the most brief history of someone’s background in chiptune I’ve ever heard. XD Well done, Chema! What about you, Marco?

AoF:  I’ve always loved videogame music.  I used to listen to it every day and sometimes I just played a game because of its tunes.  I studied Music Production and while I was doing so some of my electronic music teachers told me the music I made sounded like something out of a retro videogame XD  I started making bitpop in 2010 under the name Atoms Or Faeries.  I released my first EP on May 2013 and I came across Colectivo Chipotle.  I contacted them and met Chema in person during the FORMAT DF.  We got along really well and sometime later a curator position was available at his label. I jumped at the oportunity and here we are today.

Kuma:  Now correct me if I’m wrong, but wasn’t Format DF that shindig Virt performed at down in Mexico?  If so, I’m glad it was you guys who organized it, because if this album is any indication, you guys must have kicked ass live!

Chema:  No, those were different guys, we brought Danimal Cannon, IAYD and MENEO to a 3 day free music festival, Format.DF. It’s the biggest event of its kind in Latin America so far.

AoF:  It was great bro!  We played at an abandoned chapel that belonged to the Spanish Inquisition.  And it was sooo cool!  I wish you were there!

Chema:  The ambiance was magical, all brotherly love and all!

Kuma:  Oh man that still sounds awesome! like a South American Blipfestival or 8static Fest!  I’m so glad the chip love is spreading and that you’re making it happen!  Are there any plans to include more overseas artists in the future to the event or for you guys to travel into the US and play up north in NYC or Philly?

Chema:  I’m going to do some visuals next week in SXSW, thanks to IAYD.  It’s going to be my first show outside of my home country!

AoF:  Regarding this year’s FORMAT we’d love to invite international musicians again, of course!  We’re still in the early stages of planning, though.

Chema:  And talking about bringing people, we are making slow but steady progress for this year’s Format.DF. We already selected some musicians from South America and United States.  Last year we wanted to bring someone from Japan but it didnt happen

Kuma:  Do you have plans on inviting some of the artists on this compilation?  Cause I have to say, a lot of the people on it I’ve not heard of and I feel bad for saying that cause this albums really legit!  And if so, are there any in particular you liked working with that contributed to the label that you’d like to see have more exposure?

Chema:  Yes, I guess the Chilean artists have a record of exporting excellent music.
They are very professional and from what I know, they need more exposure.  Talking about mexican artists, we get some top quality acts, starting with Crab Sound, such a young artist, but one of the best.

AoF:  Most of the people who participated in the album will play on this year’s festival.  I can’t say I enjoyed working with any one person in particular.  Everyone was great in their own way and though there are people who are way more developed than others I enjoyed working with them all.  A chip labor of love!

Kuma:  I’m glad to hear there’s as much love where you guys are as there is where I am, and I’m glad to hear that love is starting to become more interconnected and international. Going back a bit to interconnect that idea, how did you get your gig to do visuals for SXSW, Chema?  And how long have you been doing visuals for?  Is it something you took up after getting involved musically or something you always did beforehand?

Chema:  I started doing visuals in 2011 because the chiptune shows require it.  Being a graphic designer really helps in this department.  I absolutely love doing them, it`s like a natural extension of the music and the way I do it is really like playing a live instrument. IAYD was kind enough to invite us to his hometown, and what better time than during SXSW.  He also got me the gig, I’m so exited to see Danimal, IAYD again and get to know the Tx Chiptune scene.

AoF:  IAYD is such a great guy!  He’s very talented and friendly and he parties like there’s no tomorrow!  It was difficult to keep up with his partying levels I’ll tell you that XD

Kuma:  TxChip is pretty legit.  From Kloudygirl to Star Fighter Dreams and CHICKENANDROFLS!, plus all the videogame music guys like Amanda Lepre and the Descendants of Erdrick crew.  They’re all wonderful.  And yes, they all party hard, especially IAYD.  That being said, as a curator for the Format.DF festival, are there any artists you’d really like to have perform with you guys, Marco?

AoF:  Yes. I have a list that’s longer than Santa’s.  I especially love bitpop, so Fantomenk, Dunderpatrullen and Bossfight are high on the list.  I really love Omodaka‘s work as well, the way he combines traditional japanese folk music with electronica and chiptune is so original and fantastic!  I like to include hints of Mexican folk music on my music so I feel really connected to Omodaka in that sense.

Chema:  Yeah I was thinking exactly that, Marco.  Also in the graphic department the “Mexican style” is pretty evident.  It’s not about nationalistic feelings, but about the style, that you don’t see very often in chiptune/demoscene.

Kuma:  Those are some big names, and of those, I’ve only seen Omodaka, but I can def say he alone is worth the cost of a ticket if you guys can get him to come to play for you. That hint of the traditional was something I did notice in your music on your Soundcloud page, AoF, and I thought it was pretty cool to hear something with a somewhat traditional flavor in chip.  Conversely, I gushed over how typically chip Chema’s Shatterhand remix was, so I’m glad I got hear a bit of both from you guys.  That being said, was diversity something you were def going for when you put the compilation together, or did you have other feelings/thoughts in mind when you put it together?

Chema:  I knew from the start, with this many artists, it was going to be a mess in form and style. The only criteria for this albums was: “Let’s invite our friends that make the most awesome music in the area”.  I guess quality was the definitive criteria.  I can finally be confident that the scene in this part of the world really matured in the last couple of years

AoF:  Thanks Adam!  And yeah, the music from our friends is so diverse there was no way we could’ve limited it in form or style if we wanted to remain true to what FORMAT was about. Yep, I concur with Chema.  Quality was the main criteria in this case.

Kuma:  It def shows.  Every song on the album is a lot of fun to listen to, and even some of the songs that are in styles I generally don’t listen to are still rather enjoyable. The whole compilation is just dynamic and it’s something I love and want to hear more of in the future from every net label that puts out collections like this.  That being said, once again, I’d like to thank you guys for your time.  Is there anything you two would like to say in closing before we wrap this up?

AoF:  I personally enjoyed working on this compilation very much.  It was great to experience such diversity and growth from our friends at the scene.

Chema:  I would say we still have a long road ahead of us and that this is only the beginning.  I also wanna thank you and Brandon for the interview!  It means a lot!

AoF:  Thanks so much for having us Adam!  It really means a lot to us.  We’ve been struggling to get a footing on the international scene and I feel like we’re finally making it happen!  Chip love for everyone!  Also, have you heard the phrase “Chido-Chip”, Adam?

Kuma:
  No, I can’t say I have.

AoF:  Chido is a slang word that is very similar to “cool”.  So Chido-Chip means something like Cool Chip and it carries all the energy and enthusiasm we feel for chipmusic.  I feel it represents really well the feeling and state of the Mexican scene.

Kuma:  Nice man!  Chido…I’ma have to remember that.  I’ll def spread the Chido-Chip love and vibes here, man!  Thanks again to you both for the interview!
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Thanks for tuning and keeping up with us on the blog, and especially for sticking with my derpy butt for 20 issues of Raw Cuts!  It’s been a truly fantastic ride and i can’t wait for what the future brings!  That being said, don’t forget to check out 56KBPS as well as Chema64 and Atoms or Faeries individual work!  And if you’re at SXSW, check out the chiptune and vgm showcases this week for a chance to meet Chema as well as some of the other awesome artists from across the world who are performing there!  ‘Til next time!

\m|♥|m/

Relevant Links:

56KBPS Records:
Facebook | Bandcamp | Soundcloud | Twitter

Chema64:
Facebook | Bandcamp | Soundcloud | Twitter

Atoms or Faeries:
Facebook | Bandcamp | Soundcloud 

56kbps logo 2013

Raw Cuts with Kuma #19: Petriform

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Hey ChipWINners!  Welcome back to Raw Cuts!  This time around, I took the time to chat with an artist I wasn’t really familiar with until rather recently, but in preparing for this sit down, I realized what a n00b I was for being ignorant of him til now!  Combining 15+ years of experience, enthusiasm and dedication to his craft, this eclectic composer has not only blown my mind, but has recently released a new album which can easily be considered one of the best chip albums of the year!  But don’t take my word for it!  Sit down and join me as I take the time to get to know Paul Parr, the man also known as Petriform!


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Kuma:  First and foremost I’d like to thank you for taking the time to sit down with me and do this interview!  I know it’s early in the day for you, but it means a lot having you here with me.

Petriform:  Thank you!  It’s a pleasure speaking with you.

Kuma:  So to start things off, I’d like to know how things started with you.  When did your musical journey begin and what prompted you to take to composing and producing?

Petriform:  Well, for as long as I can remember, my father was a solo performing musician; a guitarist.  He played lots of covers, and must have decided at some point that he couldn’t cover everything he wanted with just a guitar, so he was an early adopter of MIDI synthesizers and sequencers – particularly ones that could accurately emulate real instruments.  He would edit MIDI files to create backing tracks for himself, which he would then play back through a particularly good-sounding synthesizer for his live sets.  That’s how I first got into composing – with a MIDI keyboard, a synthesizer, and some early version of the Cakewalk DAW.  Just messing around with that stuff.  I never took it seriously until the mid-2000s, when a friend got me way, way into Dance Dance Revolution, and, having heard about StepMania, the open-source counterpart in which one can add their own songs, I was driven pretty heavily forward to make my own songs for that purpose.  That’s when I really started to step up and produce.

Kuma:  Oh wow!  So you’ve been at this for a while!  But I notice you mentioned that you really didn’t take it seriously for a while.  Does that mean you’re not a formally trained musician?  Was music just something you picked up from watching your dad perform and produce over the years or did you actually take the time to take formal lessons with him or another teacher?

Petriform:  I’m not formally trained.  I picked up my very first composition and production habits from my dad’s setup, but I’m self-taught in most regards, having picked up things by listening closely to the music I like, and kind of attempting to emulate the theory that makes those songs so good in production after production.  I don’t know much about formal music theory, and I can’t read music.  I’ve always picked up instruments by ear, though I’m not particularly good at any of them.  I think what it comes down to is a whole lot of listening and experimenting over the years.  It builds up.

Kuma:  I would definitely say it has!  Having listened to the back catalog of your music available on Bandcamp, I can honestly say you’re one of the most diverse musicians I’ve interviewed on Raw Cuts!  It’s that diversity I want focus on now in particular as I’ve noticed that between your solo work and your work with dtrx, your style changes a lot.  Tell me what first brought dtrx together and how much of dtrx’s music is your input?  Whats your creative process like with them vs when you’re working solo?

Petriform:  All of dtrx is myself, actually.  That’s a holdover from the years when I would use different aliases to release different genres and styles of music, kind of as a way to avoid people getting hyped for a release from me and having the result be completely different music than they’d expected.  “dtrx” was always just kind of a placeholder signature, or label, to signify that whatever was released therein, I was ultimately behind. The multiple aliases deal is a very DDR thing, so I definitely picked it up from there.  I think it was a good thing at the time, to diversify the styles of my projects so that I could explore them fully without having to meet anyone’s expectations.  But recently I’ve felt it more appropriate to consolidate down to simply Petriform; the “dtrx” is pretty much only still there as a legacy sort of thing.  It was great for me when I was experimenting with a ton of diverse projects, but I’ve been slowly phasing it out. I hope all of that makes sense!

Kuma:  You dirty SOB, you pulled a fucking Peczynski on me!

I have a feeling Carl doesn't even know what he calls himself anymore.

Petriform:  This is the part where I reveal myself to be Vince McMahon. “IT WAS ME, AUSTIN! IT WAS ME ALL ALONG!”

Kuma:  D=

Petriform:  But yeah, that whole gimmick was generally a tool to give me more space to experiment musically.

Kuma:  Well, while I’m still hurt by this betrayal, I’ll attempt to gather my composure and continue this interview.

Petriform:  Okay!

Kuma:  That being said, I find it funny that you felt the need to live up to your following so much that you felt the need to create aliases just for freedom of expression.  I wasn’t nearly as hardcore into the ddr scene as some of my friends were, but was that really a necessity now that you look back on it?  Did you really feel you’d let people if you went from like…drum and bass to footwork?

Petriform:  A necessity?  Maybe not.  From drum and bass to footwork, definitely not.  But I’ve done some pretty off-the-wall stuff like harsh noise, drone, and speedcore before, stuff that isn’t actively featured on the front page of my website and whatnot, where there’s a real night and day difference that I feel a lot of people wouldn’t really be down with.  I think it gave me more peace of mind than anything, but another component to it, and perhaps this one is more reasonable, was that I was still making songs for StepMania, where the whole DDR alias diversification really starts to become immediately relevant.  Many of my friends who I met through DDR or StepMania who have started composing music have done or still do the alias thing, too.  I still think it’s helpful for composers and producers who don’t really have a grip on their style yet, and want to try new things.

Kuma:  That’s a fair enough answer.  My sadness is less profound now.  That being said, your work has become much more streamlined over the past 2 or 3 years, and in particular I noticed this with the release of ‘Brown Plaid‘.

That’s not to say you don’t still diversify even within that album, but it flows much more cohesively than some of your previous work.  What was your creative process like on that album and how did it differ from work you had previously done?

Petriform:  ‘Brown Plaid’ is an odd one for me because I had been working on it on and off for the better part of three years, which is far longer than the work period of any other album I’ve released.  In years past, I would cap off my albums with the more moody stuff that you hear reflected in ‘Brown Plaid’, but after my album ‘Exposition‘ in 2010, I stopped, because I wanted to have an album full of that kind of stuff, and I wanted it to be special. So I would write songs for it on the side in tandem with the other projects I was working on – The Cross Section’ EPs, ‘Relentless Eventful‘, and even most of my newest, ‘Veneer‘.  I counted – by the time it was finally plausible for me to form ‘Brown Plaid’ cohesively, I had over 40 works-in-progress that I was considering for it.  I whittled that down to the fifteen tracks I though were best suited to each other and made the most cohesive album, and that’s what got released.  I haven’t had the luxury of doing that with my other albums, so its cohesion probably is far smoother.  With regard to my older work, pre-2010, I was still making StepMania songs and throwing them together into albums.  Cohesion in my work didn’t really exist until I was making it for myself and not as what essentially amounted to game design.

Kuma:  The amount of time and focus you put into BP really shows and I’m glad you took the time to make it.  For as much as any of us like a scene or feel the need to give back to it, being able to create for ourselves is just as important and I’m glad you found the time to do so.  I have to say though, whittling down from 40 tracks down to 15 is quite impressive. I haven’t heard anything like that since I last interviewed SSD engage and S.P.R.Y. said that he had some 50-odd mostly complete songs laying around he still had yet to finish and release.

We may have gotten 145 submissions for volume 2, but there was only one winner this time around

That being said, since you brought up the topic of your newest album, lets discuss that, shall we?  By the time this interview is published, the album will have been made public, but I’ve had the pleasure of listening to it early, and I have to say, and I mean this without intent of kissing ass or buttering you up, but ‘Veneer’, along with ‘Brown Plaid’, has cemented you as one of my fave musicians in the scene.  Tell me, what into making ‘Veneer’ and what did you want to get out of the experience of bringing it to fruition?

Petriform:  Thank you!  I created ‘Veneer’ because, since very early 2010, I hadn’t put out a full-length chiptune album – only EPs, most notably ‘Cross Section‘ and its follow-up, ‘Cross Section Part II‘.  With those I was testing the waters of combining the backbone of drum and bass music with predominant chiptune leads and accompaniment – something that had certainly been done before, but I hadn’t seen a lot of personally.  That, I think, might be my favorite music to make, and it turns out a lot of people liked hearing it!  I knew immediately that I wanted to bring that concept to a full-length release, and the ‘Cross Section’ EPs laid down the framework for it.  That desire strengthened considerably when I became close to the chiptune scene in and around the San Francisco Bay Area and started playing shows, something I hadn’t done for a few years, and under different names.

The combination of releases I’d put out recently and the experiences I’ve had thus far in that scene made ‘Veneer’ logically the next thing that I needed to make happen, and it’s happening.  In creating it, I hope to have strengthened my skills in chiptune tracking, which I’m always working on improving, and concept album authorship, which I kind of halfheartedly shot for.  But most importantly, I want to have created something that others can enjoy and share.  I hope ‘Veneer’ fulfills that for some people.

Kuma:  I definitely feel you have, and I know this will be one of those albums I share with people when I intro them to the chiptune.  That being said, you mentioned performances, and you have a very big one coming up very soon, don’t you?  Why don’t you tell us about Rockage 3.0 and how you got involved in this amazing follow up to Frequency 3.0!

Petriform:  Yes!  I’m extremely excited to participate in Rockage 3.0, and to experience it in general.  Rockage 2.0 last year was probably the most fun weekend I had for all of that year, and it was also my first real exposure to the chiptune scene in my area.  Previously I had simply thought that nothing was going on in local chiptune outside of San Francisco, but I was wrong – I just wasn’t looking hard enough.  And, of course, I wanted in on it.  So, on the last day of Rockage 2.0, I spoke with maybe three or four people and gave them a sampler of some of my chiptune material – one of those people being Eric Fanali, who runs Rockage and puts on chiptune shows, among many other shows, in and around San Jose, and my involvement in the local scene kind of snowballed from there.

What I can tell you about Rockage 3.0 is that the lineup is amazing; even better than last year.  I’m so very excited to be playing the same event as many of my friends and many chiptune and VGM musicians that I have a ton of respect for.  And on top of that, the plethora of free play arcade games and tournaments for prizes (if you’re going, readers, fight me at Hydro Thunder) is staggering – the fun never ends! It’s unmissable. Rockage 3.0 is at San Jose State University from February 7th to the 9th, and I hope to see you all there!

Kuma:  Oh man that sounds like MAGFest all over again!  I’m super upset I can’t make it and mad jelly of my friends who are going!  That aside, is there anyone you’re sharing the stage with you’re especially looking forward to seeing perform?  Slime Girls?  Danimal Cannon?  Space Town Savior?  Who are you most looking forward to partying with?

Petriform:  I try to make it out to see the local acts as often as I can – Slime Girls, crashfaster, Matthew Joseph Payne, Together We Are Robots, Super Soul Bros., the list goes on.  Seeing Space Boyfriend, Mega Ran, and Danimal Cannon is always fun when they roll through town.  Bit Brigade kicks ass. I’ve never seen The Megas before, so I’m looking forward to that, too!  Gnarboots is a fucking experience.  I love seeing my friends in Curious Quail and Cartoon Violence.  Sorry that I’m practically going through the whole damn lineup, but it really IS stacked – it’ll probably be the best I’ve ever attended.  It’s a party, for sure.

Kuma:  Definitely sounds like it, and I know my friends who are attending definitely can’t wait to get out there and get stupid with you.  That being said, I’d once again like to thank you for taking the time to sit down for this interview.  Is there anything you’d like to say in closing–shout outs, promotions, thank yous–before we wrap things up?

Petriform:  Well, I’d like to thank you for having me, and ChipWIN in general for being so damn awesome!  Readers, I hope you enjoy my new album, ‘Veneer’, and come out to Rockage 3.0!  Let’s party!


That wraps it up for this edition of Raw Cuts.  Don’t forget to follow Petriform on your fave form of social media, as well as checking out his music, including his newest release, ‘Veneer’, and my personal favorite,’Brown Plaid’, both of which you can listen to below!  Last but not least, if you are in the San Jose Area next weekend, do yourself a favor and get your ass to Rockage 3.0!  It is a party that is sure to impress! Peace!

\m|♥|m/

Petriform
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Rockage 3.0
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paul parr

 

 

 

 

 

 

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