Posts Tagged ‘StepMania’

Aydan Appreciates: ‘Mercury’ by Kommisar

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Having been a long-standing member of the FlashFlashRevolution community, Kommisar was a name I had commonly encountered betwixt his music and simfile charting. Kommisar has contributed to ChipWIN in the past on more than a few volumes, with each track containing his legendary, patented jazzy ‘insaneous chiptune solos’. Recently he’s re-released a number of tunes in the form of an EP titled ‘Mercury’; each piece on the EP is impressive in its own right. The most impressive facet to his compositions is the fact that all of the pieces on ‘Mercury’ were written on 1xLSDJ; this is quite hard to believe considering the depth of each track on the EP! Now that we have the ability to listen to this in its entirety as intended, let’s revisit some of these amazing tunes!

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Raw Cuts with Kuma #19: Petriform

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Hey ChipWINners!  Welcome back to Raw Cuts!  This time around, I took the time to chat with an artist I wasn’t really familiar with until rather recently, but in preparing for this sit down, I realized what a n00b I was for being ignorant of him til now!  Combining 15+ years of experience, enthusiasm and dedication to his craft, this eclectic composer has not only blown my mind, but has recently released a new album which can easily be considered one of the best chip albums of the year!  But don’t take my word for it!  Sit down and join me as I take the time to get to know Paul Parr, the man also known as Petriform!


veneer cover

Kuma:  First and foremost I’d like to thank you for taking the time to sit down with me and do this interview!  I know it’s early in the day for you, but it means a lot having you here with me.

Petriform:  Thank you!  It’s a pleasure speaking with you.

Kuma:  So to start things off, I’d like to know how things started with you.  When did your musical journey begin and what prompted you to take to composing and producing?

Petriform:  Well, for as long as I can remember, my father was a solo performing musician; a guitarist.  He played lots of covers, and must have decided at some point that he couldn’t cover everything he wanted with just a guitar, so he was an early adopter of MIDI synthesizers and sequencers – particularly ones that could accurately emulate real instruments.  He would edit MIDI files to create backing tracks for himself, which he would then play back through a particularly good-sounding synthesizer for his live sets.  That’s how I first got into composing – with a MIDI keyboard, a synthesizer, and some early version of the Cakewalk DAW.  Just messing around with that stuff.  I never took it seriously until the mid-2000s, when a friend got me way, way into Dance Dance Revolution, and, having heard about StepMania, the open-source counterpart in which one can add their own songs, I was driven pretty heavily forward to make my own songs for that purpose.  That’s when I really started to step up and produce.

Kuma:  Oh wow!  So you’ve been at this for a while!  But I notice you mentioned that you really didn’t take it seriously for a while.  Does that mean you’re not a formally trained musician?  Was music just something you picked up from watching your dad perform and produce over the years or did you actually take the time to take formal lessons with him or another teacher?

Petriform:  I’m not formally trained.  I picked up my very first composition and production habits from my dad’s setup, but I’m self-taught in most regards, having picked up things by listening closely to the music I like, and kind of attempting to emulate the theory that makes those songs so good in production after production.  I don’t know much about formal music theory, and I can’t read music.  I’ve always picked up instruments by ear, though I’m not particularly good at any of them.  I think what it comes down to is a whole lot of listening and experimenting over the years.  It builds up.

Kuma:  I would definitely say it has!  Having listened to the back catalog of your music available on Bandcamp, I can honestly say you’re one of the most diverse musicians I’ve interviewed on Raw Cuts!  It’s that diversity I want focus on now in particular as I’ve noticed that between your solo work and your work with dtrx, your style changes a lot.  Tell me what first brought dtrx together and how much of dtrx’s music is your input?  Whats your creative process like with them vs when you’re working solo?

Petriform:  All of dtrx is myself, actually.  That’s a holdover from the years when I would use different aliases to release different genres and styles of music, kind of as a way to avoid people getting hyped for a release from me and having the result be completely different music than they’d expected.  “dtrx” was always just kind of a placeholder signature, or label, to signify that whatever was released therein, I was ultimately behind. The multiple aliases deal is a very DDR thing, so I definitely picked it up from there.  I think it was a good thing at the time, to diversify the styles of my projects so that I could explore them fully without having to meet anyone’s expectations.  But recently I’ve felt it more appropriate to consolidate down to simply Petriform; the “dtrx” is pretty much only still there as a legacy sort of thing.  It was great for me when I was experimenting with a ton of diverse projects, but I’ve been slowly phasing it out. I hope all of that makes sense!

Kuma:  You dirty SOB, you pulled a fucking Peczynski on me!

I have a feeling Carl doesn't even know what he calls himself anymore.

Petriform:  This is the part where I reveal myself to be Vince McMahon. “IT WAS ME, AUSTIN! IT WAS ME ALL ALONG!”

Kuma:  D=

Petriform:  But yeah, that whole gimmick was generally a tool to give me more space to experiment musically.

Kuma:  Well, while I’m still hurt by this betrayal, I’ll attempt to gather my composure and continue this interview.

Petriform:  Okay!

Kuma:  That being said, I find it funny that you felt the need to live up to your following so much that you felt the need to create aliases just for freedom of expression.  I wasn’t nearly as hardcore into the ddr scene as some of my friends were, but was that really a necessity now that you look back on it?  Did you really feel you’d let people if you went from like…drum and bass to footwork?

Petriform:  A necessity?  Maybe not.  From drum and bass to footwork, definitely not.  But I’ve done some pretty off-the-wall stuff like harsh noise, drone, and speedcore before, stuff that isn’t actively featured on the front page of my website and whatnot, where there’s a real night and day difference that I feel a lot of people wouldn’t really be down with.  I think it gave me more peace of mind than anything, but another component to it, and perhaps this one is more reasonable, was that I was still making songs for StepMania, where the whole DDR alias diversification really starts to become immediately relevant.  Many of my friends who I met through DDR or StepMania who have started composing music have done or still do the alias thing, too.  I still think it’s helpful for composers and producers who don’t really have a grip on their style yet, and want to try new things.

Kuma:  That’s a fair enough answer.  My sadness is less profound now.  That being said, your work has become much more streamlined over the past 2 or 3 years, and in particular I noticed this with the release of ‘Brown Plaid‘.

That’s not to say you don’t still diversify even within that album, but it flows much more cohesively than some of your previous work.  What was your creative process like on that album and how did it differ from work you had previously done?

Petriform:  ‘Brown Plaid’ is an odd one for me because I had been working on it on and off for the better part of three years, which is far longer than the work period of any other album I’ve released.  In years past, I would cap off my albums with the more moody stuff that you hear reflected in ‘Brown Plaid’, but after my album ‘Exposition‘ in 2010, I stopped, because I wanted to have an album full of that kind of stuff, and I wanted it to be special. So I would write songs for it on the side in tandem with the other projects I was working on – The Cross Section’ EPs, ‘Relentless Eventful‘, and even most of my newest, ‘Veneer‘.  I counted – by the time it was finally plausible for me to form ‘Brown Plaid’ cohesively, I had over 40 works-in-progress that I was considering for it.  I whittled that down to the fifteen tracks I though were best suited to each other and made the most cohesive album, and that’s what got released.  I haven’t had the luxury of doing that with my other albums, so its cohesion probably is far smoother.  With regard to my older work, pre-2010, I was still making StepMania songs and throwing them together into albums.  Cohesion in my work didn’t really exist until I was making it for myself and not as what essentially amounted to game design.

Kuma:  The amount of time and focus you put into BP really shows and I’m glad you took the time to make it.  For as much as any of us like a scene or feel the need to give back to it, being able to create for ourselves is just as important and I’m glad you found the time to do so.  I have to say though, whittling down from 40 tracks down to 15 is quite impressive. I haven’t heard anything like that since I last interviewed SSD engage and S.P.R.Y. said that he had some 50-odd mostly complete songs laying around he still had yet to finish and release.

We may have gotten 145 submissions for volume 2, but there was only one winner this time around

That being said, since you brought up the topic of your newest album, lets discuss that, shall we?  By the time this interview is published, the album will have been made public, but I’ve had the pleasure of listening to it early, and I have to say, and I mean this without intent of kissing ass or buttering you up, but ‘Veneer’, along with ‘Brown Plaid’, has cemented you as one of my fave musicians in the scene.  Tell me, what into making ‘Veneer’ and what did you want to get out of the experience of bringing it to fruition?

Petriform:  Thank you!  I created ‘Veneer’ because, since very early 2010, I hadn’t put out a full-length chiptune album – only EPs, most notably ‘Cross Section‘ and its follow-up, ‘Cross Section Part II‘.  With those I was testing the waters of combining the backbone of drum and bass music with predominant chiptune leads and accompaniment – something that had certainly been done before, but I hadn’t seen a lot of personally.  That, I think, might be my favorite music to make, and it turns out a lot of people liked hearing it!  I knew immediately that I wanted to bring that concept to a full-length release, and the ‘Cross Section’ EPs laid down the framework for it.  That desire strengthened considerably when I became close to the chiptune scene in and around the San Francisco Bay Area and started playing shows, something I hadn’t done for a few years, and under different names.

The combination of releases I’d put out recently and the experiences I’ve had thus far in that scene made ‘Veneer’ logically the next thing that I needed to make happen, and it’s happening.  In creating it, I hope to have strengthened my skills in chiptune tracking, which I’m always working on improving, and concept album authorship, which I kind of halfheartedly shot for.  But most importantly, I want to have created something that others can enjoy and share.  I hope ‘Veneer’ fulfills that for some people.

Kuma:  I definitely feel you have, and I know this will be one of those albums I share with people when I intro them to the chiptune.  That being said, you mentioned performances, and you have a very big one coming up very soon, don’t you?  Why don’t you tell us about Rockage 3.0 and how you got involved in this amazing follow up to Frequency 3.0!

Petriform:  Yes!  I’m extremely excited to participate in Rockage 3.0, and to experience it in general.  Rockage 2.0 last year was probably the most fun weekend I had for all of that year, and it was also my first real exposure to the chiptune scene in my area.  Previously I had simply thought that nothing was going on in local chiptune outside of San Francisco, but I was wrong – I just wasn’t looking hard enough.  And, of course, I wanted in on it.  So, on the last day of Rockage 2.0, I spoke with maybe three or four people and gave them a sampler of some of my chiptune material – one of those people being Eric Fanali, who runs Rockage and puts on chiptune shows, among many other shows, in and around San Jose, and my involvement in the local scene kind of snowballed from there.

What I can tell you about Rockage 3.0 is that the lineup is amazing; even better than last year.  I’m so very excited to be playing the same event as many of my friends and many chiptune and VGM musicians that I have a ton of respect for.  And on top of that, the plethora of free play arcade games and tournaments for prizes (if you’re going, readers, fight me at Hydro Thunder) is staggering – the fun never ends! It’s unmissable. Rockage 3.0 is at San Jose State University from February 7th to the 9th, and I hope to see you all there!

Kuma:  Oh man that sounds like MAGFest all over again!  I’m super upset I can’t make it and mad jelly of my friends who are going!  That aside, is there anyone you’re sharing the stage with you’re especially looking forward to seeing perform?  Slime Girls?  Danimal Cannon?  Space Town Savior?  Who are you most looking forward to partying with?

Petriform:  I try to make it out to see the local acts as often as I can – Slime Girls, crashfaster, Matthew Joseph Payne, Together We Are Robots, Super Soul Bros., the list goes on.  Seeing Space Boyfriend, Mega Ran, and Danimal Cannon is always fun when they roll through town.  Bit Brigade kicks ass. I’ve never seen The Megas before, so I’m looking forward to that, too!  Gnarboots is a fucking experience.  I love seeing my friends in Curious Quail and Cartoon Violence.  Sorry that I’m practically going through the whole damn lineup, but it really IS stacked – it’ll probably be the best I’ve ever attended.  It’s a party, for sure.

Kuma:  Definitely sounds like it, and I know my friends who are attending definitely can’t wait to get out there and get stupid with you.  That being said, I’d once again like to thank you for taking the time to sit down for this interview.  Is there anything you’d like to say in closing–shout outs, promotions, thank yous–before we wrap things up?

Petriform:  Well, I’d like to thank you for having me, and ChipWIN in general for being so damn awesome!  Readers, I hope you enjoy my new album, ‘Veneer’, and come out to Rockage 3.0!  Let’s party!


That wraps it up for this edition of Raw Cuts.  Don’t forget to follow Petriform on your fave form of social media, as well as checking out his music, including his newest release, ‘Veneer’, and my personal favorite,’Brown Plaid’, both of which you can listen to below!  Last but not least, if you are in the San Jose Area next weekend, do yourself a favor and get your ass to Rockage 3.0!  It is a party that is sure to impress! Peace!

\m|♥|m/

Petriform
Facebook | Bandcamp | Soundcloud | Tumblr | Twitter | Youtube

Rockage 3.0
Facebook | Tumblr | Twitter | Fb Event

paul parr

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Guest Speaker: Aydan Scott on Kola Kid’s Afterparty

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We here at the Chiptunes = WIN Blog are EXTREMELY happy to be presenting a new guest writer, Aydan Scott, speaking this week about chipbreak gigamoth Kola Kid.
So everyone put down your ‘Get Lucky’ vinyls and give your most raucous and welcoming of applause! Take it away Aydan:
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Russian chipartist Kola Kid transforms ideas and themes from numerous genres to create an extremely unique and incredible sound. I discovered Kola Kid through StepMania. Songs by Kola Kid in the game include ‘Can’t Hide Your Love’, ‘Purple Drank’, and ‘Spaceman’, all stepped by chiptune prodigy Kommisar. His first release, ‘Rave to the Grave’, is fast, hard-hitting, and extremely aggressive – the essence of chipbreak. His music calls breakbeat artists such as Venetian Snares and The Flashbulb to mind; it also calls to mind Sabrepulse‘s album ‘Chipbreak Wars’, which is, to me, the defining album of the chipbreak genre.

However, ‘Rave to the Grave’ is not the album that I’m interested in for the sake of this review; I’m going to be reviewing ‘Afterparty’, a much calmer album compared to its predecessor. The drum patterns are reminiscent to those of Sabrepulse, but the melodies used are far less harsh and aggressive in tone. ‘solar flux’ is the opening to the album, and its soothing melody flows extremely well against the static drum samples. The second track, ‘square spooner fisher pusher’, transitions well from the previous track; the fluidity of the transition is one of the highlights of this album.

The third track, ‘like a robot’, takes on a darker tone, whilst still remaining fairly calm. The rhythm and melodies in this song are particularly memorable, and the choppiness of the vocal sampling is a fantastic addition. ‘0909’ follows, returning to the previous, upbeat tone. The repetition in the beginning sets the listener up for a nice change in the rhythm, and as the melody repeats itself, more and more is layered over it until it climaxes with a somewhat abrupt end.

The final track, ‘lucky 13’, is the most interesting to me. It opens with an incredibly aggressive tone, and once the melody is introduced, the drums back off completely before the two of them join together. I feel as though ‘lucky 13’ could have expanded on its theme just a little bit more, and it could have ended less suddenly; Kola Kid’s intent, however, may very well have been to instil this kind of feeling onto the listener. ‘Afterparty’ is an excellent example of “how to chipbreak”; if you enjoyed Kola Kid’s second release, you can download it in the embed below. 

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