Posts Tagged ‘The Waveform Generators’

Aydan Appreciates: ‘C.O.M.P.A.S.S.’ by Spaceman Fantastiques

Posted by

Some of the most successful and inspiring musical endeavors are concept albums, more narrowly defined as albums with a specific message to deliver, story to tell, or idea to convey. One of the most recent chiptune concept albums, Spaceman Fantastiques’ prog-rock-chip amalgam entitled ‘C.O.M.P.A.S.S.’, was released through The Waveform Generators just this past September. Admittedly, I missed the debut of this album, but discovered it not long after its release, and loved it so much that I decided that it absolutely had to be the topic of my monthly column. So let’s see where ‘C.O.M.P.A.S.S.’ takes us!

As with many concept albums, the first track – the introduction or exposition to the story – can be considered the most important song in establishing the theme behind the project. ‘SSW’ opens with a cascading flow of different sounds; cymbals crash, chip voices sweep through octaves, and white noise builds up mysterious vibes before a cadence reminiscent of a transmission of sorts. From here, the track decrescendoes into nothingness and leaves the listener with a sense of awe before its silent transition.

‘C.O.M.P.A.S.S.’ spans an enormous number of different moods as it tells its tale. The second track, ‘SW’, is a near perfect example of how seamlessly these different emotions can flow into one another. The opening guitar strumming and quickly decaying chip voices provide a sense of wonderment and feelings of exploration and curiosity. Percussion enters, and more voices build up tension until the track peaks for the first time, energetically and brimming with excitement. A simple yet memorable chip riff segues perfectly into a secondary calming segment, just before ‘SW’ climaxes with dueling guitar and chip solos into a phenomenal ending.

Different musical influences throughout the album and entirely unique sounds span far and wide, as well. Calls to the symphonic and choral can be heard in combination with progressive overtones through the almost vocal-sounding instruments present in ‘NE’, for one. In contrast, it’s difficult to place a specific genre onto ‘WNW’, and that’s not a bad thing in the slightest. Spaceman Fantastiques sculpts a track that has me imagining the reversal of time; ‘WNW’ sounds almost like a track being played backwards for an alternate piece.

Avid chipmusic fans may notice that in a majority of the pieces on Spaceman Fantastiques’ latest work, chip voices take on a rhythmic role in order to let organic melodies shine through. This isn’t always entirely true, however. For example, in ‘W’, the first half of the song has chip take on a majority of the melodic element, while Spaceman Fantastiques’ guitar work is more rhythmic in nature. Melodic focus is slowly transitioned from chip to organic around the midpoint of the track flawlessly; shifts in melodic focus are something I rarely hear done well, and Spaceman Fantastiques really nails it with ‘W’.

I’ve only covered about a third of this phenomenal piece of work, but describing the entire album the way that I do with my other reviews would be almost too deconstructive and detailed in nature. This album is truly an experience that needs to be had in order to be fully understood in all of its glory. In order to fully comprehend the purpose and motivation behind this ambitious album, we have to be able to understand the meaning of ‘C.O.M.P.A.S.S.’ from the eyes of Spaceman Fantastiques himself. So without further ado, I present to you my wondrously fruitful interview with Spaceman Fantastiques on his latest masterpiece.
______________________________________________________________________

Aydan Scott: What ideas or themes are being expressed through “C.O.M.P.A.S.S.”?

Spaceman Fantastiques: The main theme of the album is exploration. It’s about a man who is looking for direction in life. He learns of a fabled artifact called the C.O.M.P.A.S.S. and goes in search of it. The problem is that anything he reads about it tells him something completely different in terms of finding it. So he sets out on a journey to gather more information and hopefully find what he is looking for. After a journey around the globe he talks with someone who tells him an introspective that changes everything. All the things he was looking for and all the things he has done ARE the C.O.M.P.A.S.S. He finds out that it is not an object but a journey in and of itself. a Collection Of Many Paths Altering Self Synapse.

That being said, the album is really about exploring life and trusting yourself, no matter where your travels take you.

A: What different genres did you take influence from with regards to composition?

SF: When I started this project it was actually much smaller in terms of songs. It was only going to be 4 main songs and 4 intermediate ones. I really just wanted to have 4 different styles of songs and then blend them in between. What I ended up with was much more grand. I drew inspiration from a lot of places. For the main songs I wanted them all to be epic in their own ways, from well thought out rock solos to sporadic stream of consciousness solos…from [me being] completely obsessed over note placement to one night of me messing around on the keyboard. Specific influences are hard to nail down as there are often several within the same track but I will do my best. In no particular order: Omar Rodriguez Lopez, Aphex Twin, The Sound of Animals Fighting, Nobuo Uematsu, the music from Hotline Miami, the Braid sound track, Mystic Quest, post rock outfits like MONO and Godspeed You, math rock like LITE and Jizue, chill stuff like sleepytimejesse, aviel, and Lifeformed, crazy arpeggios from Makeup and Vanity Set, Miles Davis, Tool, The Protomen, Queens of the Stone Age, Smashing Pumpkins… the list is much longer than that, but those are the main ones that I can think of at the moment.

533344_426877957341362_673264688_n

A: What does your creative process entail?

SF: The creative process… this is something that is so strange for me. Initially it happens very fast. Most of the main songs were almost completely written in a single day (each). Then came the perfection. Once the main track structure was down came the obsessive listening and re-listening, losing myself in the music only to find one extra hi-hat hit or a bass fill. The main songs were something that, even with [them] being mostly completed so quickly, it could [take] months or years in between the tracks. They almost all started with me sitting in bed messing around on guitar and once I recorded that riff the writing took over. For some songs the progression was effortless (W for example); [for] others it was far more tedious (E). Even with both of those songs switching time signatures, one was far easier than the other. I can’t really say why. I think a lot of the composition depends on mental status. When writing W I was happy and healthy, and when writing E I was sick, the weather was shit, and it was hard to stay focused (which is kind of appropriate considering the directions).

As for the notes themselves, I have many ways of composing. The most common way is with guitar and a loop. I loop what I have, and then just noodle on guitar. When I find something I like, I transcribe it into MIDI or record it. A lot of it is just feeling expressed through strings. A lot of the songs have large gaps between them in terms of when they were composed. The first song I made (not even knowing it was for this album at the time) was SW. I went home on a Friday night, got a beer from the fridge, opened it and never finished. I started recording and got so lost. I had just found an old Moog synth on the side of the road and was so excited to use it that I couldn’t stop messing around. I worked for about seven hours and that is SW. It did change a little, but the structure is the same as the night I wrote that song. The problem I find with this writing process is that I get so into it and then I have no other ideas. I put everything i had been storing up into a song. This is absolutely why this album took so long. I wrote songs based on experiences I had…and those take time.

AS FOR THE INTERMEDIATE SONGS: Most of these were made while sitting at [a] local coffee place on my lunch break. I wanted these tracks to be more simple…things that were nice little slices amidst the epic cardinal and secondary directions. I made rules for these songs. No changing parts. Under 5 instruments. Nothing fast or intense. They are meant for resting between the other tracks.

A: Why did you choose to release this on TWG?

SF: I have known Andrew for quite a while now and he was one of the first people I talked to about the album and the idea behind it. He asked me to release it on TWG and I absolutely agreed. I actually think I was asked when he first started the label… and then I released as it was closing. haha. At the time, I wanted to branch out from solely chiptune, and my talks with Andrew led to a lot of excitement and ideas. He is a really great guy and is absolutely going places. I am glad I got to be a part of TWG even if [it was] only at the end.

A: How long did the project take to finish? Also, did you do it all in one go (was it your one and only focus in terms of musical projects) or did you piece it together over a long period of time?

SF: I mentioned this a little previously, but the album took about 3 years to make. From the initial idea’s conception back in 2011 to writing songs that ended up being used for other things (‘The World According To Mr. Meleon‘) or walking away from it completely to write different stuff (‘[sleep]‘), it has been a looooong journey. I think that really helped with it all. The first song that was written was SW (back then Song 1), [which] was followed by the first 30 seconds of NW (originally Song 2). Song 2 was abandoned until this past summer, where I was able to pick [it] up effortlessly and turn it into what it is now, NW. In that time I wrote a few different things. A few one-of tracks, a lot of b-sides from ‘tWAtMM’, ‘[sleep]’, and ‘a thousand days and a day‘. I think making all the other stuff while still working on this helped immensely. Using my experience from ‘[sleep]’ and ‘aTDaaD’ I was able to refine a lot of my writing process and boil down ideas a lot stronger. I also discovered several new techniques in Logic along the way that helped.

compass

A: Are you pleased with the way this project turned out? If not, is there anything you’d change now if you had the opportunity?

SF: I really am pleased. I make music firstly for myself. I make things I want to listen to over and over again. It can be frustrating at times, but it is almost always worth it. As with most art, there are always blemishes that maybe only the artist will notice or care about, but…I call [them] something I like to just have that be part of the project’s charm.
There are things I could have leveled out, or fixed some sloppy notation, but the way I released it is something I am more than happy with.

A: What’s next for Spaceman Fantastiques?

SF: This is something I have been asking myself since I realized I was done with the album… Hm… I do have some things I am working on, but nothing I can really mention at the moment, but as always… it’ll be something fantastique.
______________________________________________________________________

‘C.O.M.P.A.S.S.’ is truly a modern masterpiece. Spaceman Fantastiques takes us with him on his journey to find the legendary C.O.M.P.A.S.S. and shows us immeasurably beautiful sounds and ideas along the way. Priced at just under $5 USD, this is an incredibly small price to pay for the sheer excellence contained within. I’m honored to have been able to showcase this piece of work for you, and I hope that your own C.O.M.P.A.S.S. leads you to happiness. Never forget that life is a journey, not a destination.

So much love to all of you.

Spaceman Fantastiques
Bandcamp | Facebook | Soundcloud | Twitter

V.3 Logo - (250x250 pix for blog)

Stoking the Forge: MrWimmer – An Interesting Life

Posted by

Good morrow and glad tidings my fair fellow Chip-citizens!  This month, I’m pleased as punch to bring you a review of Mr. Alex Wimmer’s upcoming release via The Waveform Generators, “An interesting Life”!  Additionally, thanks to modern technology, I had the distinct pleasure of getting a few minutes of face time with MrWimmer to learn a little bit about the album.

10714669_10204673844785387_988008092_n“An Interesting Life” is the product of a year’s sweat and toil on the part of the artist.  While he encountered ups; he encountered downs, and he defeated all comers that sought to get in his path.

Was it worth it?  In my opinion, yes.  Hands down, yes.  The way MrWimmer’s meshed his voice with a jazz fueled fusion of chips, synths, and other instruments glows with that venerable lounge singer style.  So much so that after I finished my first listen, I honestly wanted to queue up some Sinatra.

Now, vocals typically imply that these tunes have lyrics. If you chose to engage in that little bit of applied logic, you’d be correct.  I inquired with MrWimmer as to whether there was a narrative to the album.  He responded that there was, and that it was preconceived.  When asked about it, he responded: “I creatively refuse to answer the question.”

Out of respect for that response, this review will focus solely on the musical aspects of the album. The lyrics are left to you, the discerning listener, as a personal experience to enjoy for yourself.

(more…)

Quenching the Forge: The Green Faerie

Posted by

Absinthe is a storied spirit, traveling a winding road over more than 200 years that started with it as a patent medicine.  It grew to a widely popular drink with cultural influence, being driven underground by being falsely associated with violent crime and mental illness, and finally being largely decriminalized by 2011.

Privat-Livemont-Absinthe_Robette-1896

Seriously, heckuva story.

History aside, absinthe isn’t for everyone.  The anise flavor is strong with this spirit.  So much so that I’ve seen cocktail recipes calling for naught but a rinse of the glass.  Further, it packs a wallop.  Distilled absinthe is typically between 45% and 74% ABV, though some modern cold-mixed varieties can reach 89.9% ABV.

(more…)

Raw Cuts with Kuma #17: Vegas Diamond

Posted by

Sup ChipWINners!  Welcome back to Raw Cuts!  This time around, I got the chance to sit down and talk with a remarkable young man from Belgium who’s been making the Eurochip scene grind all nice and slow to some of the sickest chip hop beats you’ve ever heard!  Having found success in his craft to the point where he’s been featured twice in local newscasts, this artist continues to push the envelope with each album, and I was lucky enough to catch up with him to talk about his new album, most recent performance, and what got him into the scene in the first place!  So hold onto japanties and put on your thinking caps as I take the time to delve into the mind of Stephan Tul aka Vegas Diamond!

vegas diamond

——————————————————————————————————————–

Kuma:  So Stephan, first off, I’d like to thank you for taking the time to sit down with me and conduct this interview.  I know you’re a busy guy, but it makes me happy knowing I was able to get you for this.

Vegas Diamond (Vegas):  My pleasure, I’m glad to be interviewed by you!

Kuma:  I’m glad to hear it.  So, let’s start with something basic.  What got you into into chiptune in the first place?  How did you get wrapped up in this world of making music with Game Boys?

Vegas:  Well, I’ve always had a fascination with ‘game music’, so to speak. I used to play a lot of Mega Man and Chrono Trigger on SNES emulators, well into my teens actually.  I’d always wanted to try stuff like that myself so in 2007 or 2008 I tried my hand at MilkyTracker.  I tried to make some hiphop/dubstep stuff on there but that kind of failed.

I then switched to Renoise which is really nice but that also didn’t really work out.  It was then I decided making music on a computer wasn’t really it for me.  There’s too many options, plug-ins, samples, whatever.  So I started making music on a Game Boy and it’s been a nice ride so far!

I guess this also explains what I love most about music on Game Boys/consoles: the minimalism.  You have very few tools to work with and that makes you focus on composition and sound design.

Kuma:  Wow!  I had no idea you had been making music for that long!  I only know you through what you’ve been making on your Game Boys, so it’s a bit of a shock to hear you’ve been making music for that long!  I do agree with you on what you said, though: options lead to indecisiveness, and when you’re trying to find your sound, your niche, options can be a detrimental factor to self discovery.

Have you always gone by Vegas Diamond, or did you make your work under another name?  And what’s the story behind your name, anyway?

Vegas:  The Vegas Diamond name has so far been used exclusively for my Game Boy output.  The story behind the name is actually pretty bland.  I had a track finished and I wanted to upload it to Soundcloud and Facebook, but I needed a name to go with it.  At the time I listened to a lot of Rustie and Hudson Mohawke, two musicians I really love, and they have a kind of nonsensical, gangster style going on.  I chose the name Vegas Diamond because it is over the top and points towards the music I love most: hip hop and beat influenced music.  It also allows me to get away with using a lot of gold and glitter in artwork so that is nice.  Although I must say I do take my music pretty seriously so maybe taking such an over-the-top name was a bad idea. I still like it though!

shiny stephan

Kuma:  I do too, and I’m glad you brought up Hudson Mohawke because I wanted to address something you said before.  About how you said you had tried making dubstep on trackers before getting into making the music you do now with Game Boys. You? Dubstep?  Really?  I’m sorry, but I have trouble believing Belgium’s premiere chip hop beat maker tried making dubstep at one point!  Tell me, what made you transition to the music you do now and why?

Stephan:  When I say dubstep I think I should clarify that this was before Skrillex and the genre that would become known as “brostep”.  The ‘earlier’ dubstep (I don’t know a good name for it) had a pretty chilled out vibe to it, lots of reggae influences and more ‘space’ in between sounds.  For me, hearing dubstep was the first time I realized you could make ‘slow’ electronic music that wasn’t your typical 4-to-the-floor fare.  I think it progressed fairly naturally beyond that.

When dubstep started getting really loud and ‘drop-focused’, I stopped listening and started listening to hip hop influenced music more and more, Hudson Mohawke specifically.  I think the same thing happened with me and ‘trap’ music.  I like trap music or trap-influenced beats in general.  I do not like the gigantic-sounding drop-focused approach to it.  Although I do have to admit I am guilty of putting ‘drops’ in my own songs.

Kuma:  Oh shit!  So when you say dubstep, you’re one of those rare people that means real dubstep, and not squirellex!  Mad respect, my friend!

As far as drops go, there’s certainly nothing wrong with using the technique so long as it’s not the main point of your music. That being said, since you’ve already mentioned Hudson Mohawke a couple times already, who are some of your biggest influences aside from him?  Which artists make you want to push your art even further?

Vegas:  In the chipscene, I’d say Boaconstructor and NNNNNNNNNN are a definite ‘goal’ for me in terms of production value and sound design.  On the other end of the spectrum you have Guardia, who makes the most chilled out hip-hop influenced songs ever.  The sheer sparseness of his music is something I go for but never manage to achieve. I always go for one more layer or sound or part.  Oh!  I should put in a good mention for ABSRDST, too!  I love his albums and the atmosphere.  I’m not sure if you can consider him someone in the ‘scene’ anymore but I love his albums.

Looking at other music, I really don’t know. I like listening to piano music, jazz, almost all forms of music.  I think if I’d have to pick something I’d pick stuff that is influential to me right now.  That means it probably won’t be influential to me next week, I’ll probably have moved on to another album. I always run into this problem when having to put together lists, I love (and have loved) so many different things I can’t really put together an album top 10 or things that influence me most.

Kuma:  Yeah all those artists are legit, and ABSRDST deserves mad love. Scene or not, he’s one of the more driven talents I’ve encountered and I admire his enthusiasm and determination for what he makes and what he does.  And I also agree with you on shifting influences, but I feel that’s only natural for people to constantly move from one outlet to another, both in terms of both intake and output.

That being said, let’s talk about about how your style has evolved over the years.  While there’s certainly no escaping some of the unique tones produced by chip tune, I’ve noticed your music, not only stylistically, but tonally, has become less chip.  It sounds smoother, and admittedly, more accessible.  Was this what you were talking about before when you said you wanted to achieve a production level akin to Boaconstructor?  A sense of accessibility to your music despite the method in which you produce it?

Vegas:  When I talk about Boa specifically I’m not referring to his music being accessible. I do think his music is very accessible up to the point where you could mix it in with normal EDM and it wouldn’t sound out of place.  I’m actually specifically referring to his impressive sound design, to how much ‘power’ and different sounds he can squeeze out of that little chip.  Sometimes you hear things on other tracks that make you wonder how they were achieved, I’m all like: “how did he do this?” “is this 1 lsdj?” etc.etc.

Kuma:  Ah okay.  Yeah there are definitely guys out there that make me wonder how they do what they do what they do with their equipment.  Guys like Auxcide blow me away with their stuff all the time, and when I find out tracks like “Realms” are only 2 lsdj, I just feel like quitting. XD

Regardless, you seem to have enjoyed a fair level of exposure doing what you do, and I know because this isn’t your first interview. Tell me, how did Deredactie find out about you for their news segment on you?

Vegas:  This was actually a chain of events that started because I was playing Bitgrid in Antwerp.  A journalist from the local paper called the organizer and wanted to talk to an artist.  Because I was the first one they could reach I was interviewed and got an article in the paper.  A few days later I got an E-mail from Belgian National TV saying they would like to do a feature on me.  I guess this was a ‘chain of events’ kind of thing which started out fairly small but turned out to be pretty big (and very fun!).

Kuma:  Awesome!  I love hearing stories about things that just come together like that! And to think it started out as something simple like you just playing a show.  Speaking of shows, you recently played a show last week Petra’s Place alongside guys like I Am Legendary Robot and Sporozoite + Grand Aigle!  How did that show go?  Did you treat the guys there to your newest album?

Vegas:  Yes I did!  I just made a new set so I played every song on the new album.  It went over pretty well, I even got to do an encore!  It was great to see part of the Belgian scene again.  I’d never seen I Am Legendary Robot or Sporozoïte before and it was cool to see their approaches to chipmusic (which is chipmetal and laptop chiptune/breakcore respectively).  Roccow was supposed to come as well but he had to cancel which is very unfortunate because AFAIK he turns floors into fire.

Kuma:  Yeah of what little I’ve heard of RoccoW’s music, I could only imagine the guy is a beast live!  And I’m happy to hear that you got such a warm response to your music! That’s very cool!

Are you happy with the way the new album–‘Hyper’– has turned out?  Are you surprised by people’s responses to it in anyway?

Vegas:  Yes!  I am very happy with the response to the album.  I really didn’t know what to expect since this is my first release made with LSDj and also because the chip hop style may put some people off.  I got a lot of nice responses from a lot of people, which I didn’t really expect.  The most surprising response was the review by Remy on the Chiptunes=WIN blog!  It was so positive it made my heart bleed (but in a good way!).  I’d never expect someone to call my EP “one of 2013’s top chiptune albums”!

Kuma:  Remy’s a very honest guy and I’m proud to call him a friend and colleague, so when he says something, he genuinely means it.  I have to say, we’re usually in agreement on a lot of things musically, your album being one of them!  ‘Hyper’ is one of the nicest surprises of the year, and anyone who doesn’t enjoy your music because it’s chip hop can go jump in a well, ’cause your music is legit.

Is there anything working in LSDj taught you about yourself and your method for making music after years of doing so with nanoloop?  Has your preference changed now that you’ve put out this album?

Vegas:  I prefer LSDj over nanoloop and I think I will continue to do so for the foreseeable future.  I had to really get used to working with it (especially the tracker interface) but now it works better than nanoloop for me.  Working with lsdj/nanoloop has taught me that melodies aren’t my strong point.  I think if you listen to ‘Hyper’ you will see that the album actually contains very little melody, most of it is bassline and harmonies, which I am fine with and I think suits my music.  Also, I love samples (808 snare YESS) and nanoloop doesn’t have those.

Kuma:  Nice. I’m glad to hear you’ve found something that works for you, and having been someone whose used piggy tracker for a while, I can definitely say having samples at your disposal in a tracker is very fun!

Well Stephan, it seems we’re nearing the end of our time together.  I’ve asked you everything I’ve wanted to ask and you’ve provided some very insightful answers.  Is there anything you’d like to say in closing before we wrap things up? Any final words you’d like to leave our readers with?

Vegas:  I’d like to thank you for having me, it was fun!  I’d also like to thank everyone who is reading this and everyone who has ever listened to my music!

ALSO! I’m still looking for other chip hop artists.  I’d be very interested in hearing other artists’ approach to the style.

Kuma:  Anytime, Stephan!  I definitely look forward to talking to you again and hearing more music from you!  Peace!
——————————————————————————————————————–

That’s it for this edition of RCwK!  Tune in next time as I bring you a very special edition of Raw Cuts pertaining to an awesome upcoming event you guys should be hella excited about!  Don’t forget to follow Vegas Diamond on Facebook and check his newest album ‘Hyper’, which was distributed by our friend Andrew Kilpatrick and the rest of the team over at The Waveform Generators!  Peace!

\m|♥|m/

Vegas Diamond
Facebook | Soundcloud

The Waveform Generators
Bandcamp | Facebook

stephan gettin down nigga

C=W logo redux (larger)

ReMi-ReViews: ‘Hyper’ by Vegas Diamond

Posted by

Let it never be said that Vegas Diamond is unwilling to defy expectations. ‘Hyper‘, with all the implications of its name, would be a bullet train of sugary melodies and four-on-the-floor dance beats in anyone else’s hands, but Vegas Diamond is not nearly so predictable. It might be just a BIT pretentious to imply that the album’s title rings true in a more cerebral sense, but something about that theory just… clicks.

Apparating seemingly out of the blue with his debut chip album Sea in mid-2012, Stephan Tul, a.k.a. Vegas Diamond, has stood tall alongside fellow Netherlands-based chiptune artists in creating what I can only describe professionally as “some seriously mindblowing shit”. The Waveform Generator‘s eleventh release, Vegas Diamond’s ‘Hyper’, may not initially give off the feel of a concept album. That’s understandable. It’s only through repeated listens that this meticulously crafted collection of tracks truly reveals itself, as each one satisfyingly builds off of previous ideas while maintaining a sense of individuality unique to each of its four parts.

“Visor”, for example, shifts in a bold tonal direction away from the opening track “Ion”, yet retains enough hints of its predecessor throughout its own structure to be sensationally rewarding when noticed… and somehow this feat is performed with the right degree of subtlety for these two songs to FEEL completely different. It’s impressive, especially considering Vegas Diamond’s tendency to induce a trance-like state upon his listener through ridiculously dense sonic tunnels and phenomenally layering.

“Real” continues to showcase Vegas Diamond’s unique approach to the chiptune medium, almost in an ironic fashion, delivering the EP’s most ethereal and mystifying melodies, unorthodox to the extent that I nearly hesitate to classify them as such. Much of the songwriting seems to eschew instruments as simply being means to convey melodies or rhythms, each individual one instead being an atmospheric storyteller… having a voice, so to say, that carries the various threads throughout ‘Hyper’ to their conclusion. If I’m gushing or going a little too far into space here, allow me to break things down: I absolutely love this album and my words are insufficient to describe it.

So despite having no less than a million things going on simultaneously, what’s perhaps ‘Hyper’s’ single greatest accomplishment is how paradoxically tight the whole thing sounds. Every single element of this release complements the last, unifying in what is one of 2013’s top chiptune albums. This is a must-have release among what I’m sure are many to come. Thanks, Vegas.

Vegas Diamond
Soundcloud | Facebook

CW-logo-redux-larger-png1.png