Posts Tagged ‘tricks’

Rhyphte’s Remarks: Why Collabs Are Pretty Cool

Posted by

A lot of people make the bassline (huehue) assumption that multiple musicians working together is automatically a band. While the vast majority of multi-man musical acts do come in the tried-and-true form of live-performance groups, the picture is much blurrier in the realm of electronic music characterized by digital production and playback. Due to the relative ease of collaborating piecewise with an individual thousands of miles away via the internet, you see things like features, remixes, and group handles all over the place. While this article is mostly aimed at getting into the “collab” side of things, most of what’s covered can be applied to anything similar enough.

So let’s dive into what a collab actually is, how it can help you grow, and how to manage the development of one!

(more…)

Paul’s Tech Talk – LSDJ 5.3.5_4x Part 2: Sandpaper vs Eardrums

Posted by

Hello all and thank you for reading Paul’s Tech Talk on The ChipWIN Blog!

This article is the second part of an issue on the spicy topic of PSG Chip Overclocking. In the first part, we tackled the basic theory behind what overclocking could achieve on an NES when ticks sped up enough to reach into the audio range. Today, we’re going to try and be more specific, and try out some practical examples on Gameboy.

While audio range speeds can be achieved at high tempos on stock LSDJ, we’re going to try and venture beyond that, thanks to the very unique test build of LSDJ: 5.3.5_4x, which multiplies tempo by FOUR.

Let’s dive in!

(more…)

Paul’s Tech Talk – LSDJ 5.1.0, Civil War Part 2: The new L command, and KICKS

Posted by

Hello all and thank you for reading The ChipWIN Blog!

In the last issue of this column, we tackled the infamous 5.1.0 LSDJ update and dwelled on the theory of what it brought to the table. To cut it short, it all boiled down to a complete redesign of Pitch behaviour. What the community did not expect, was all the ramifications and ripples it would have, and it ended up being a highly controversial update, to which many would actually choose to turn a blind eye.

If you haven’t already, I suggest reading the first part of this article before delving into this one, just to get familiar with what’s at stake. In this second part, I will first spend some time going over the specifics of the all-new L command also introduced in 5.1.0. Then I will go over how I view the anatomy of Kicks. And then, finally, I will try to get more practical, and give several examples of how to work with LSDJ 5.1.0 and above to utilize all these new features to the fullest.

Let’s dive in!

(more…)

Paul’s Tech Talk – LSDJ 5.1.0, Civil War Part 1: “Linear” Pitch

Posted by

Hello beautiful people and thank you for reading Paul’s Tech Talk on The ChipWIN Blog!

Today we’re going to tackle one, if not THE most groundbreaking update that happened to LSDJ in the midst of all its crazy transformations. With 5.1.0, Johan Kotlinski decided to rewrite the entire pitch behaviour in LSDJ from scratch. For the sake of this article I’m going to try and keep an unbiased point of view. Even though I am pretty partial to the newer versions, I still use the older ones as well. But it’s safe to say that this update was probably the most controversial of all, and it ruffled a few feathers in the community.

In music in general, but more particularly from a software perspective in LSDJ, Pitch is a solid foundation on which a lot of elements are built. And even though LSDJ is a shining example of software ergonomics and accessible design, its complexity still gives it a bit of a learning curve. The 5.1.0 update shook things up so much that artists would either have to relearn a lot of tried-and-true techniques that would now work just as well but very differently, or refrain from upgrading altogether, deliberately missing out on later updates and bug fixes.

Long story short, for a lot of people, upgrading to 5.1.0 and above would break songs from older versions and render quite a few staple sound design techniques obsolete. Let’s take a quick look at what has changed and get a better grasp of the situation.

(more…)